Dodge Ram 1500 - 2 or 4 wheel drive

Page 1 of 3  
I am considering buying a Dodge Ram 1500 in the UK, as I want something big, intimidating and an expression of my manhood : ).
I notice that most Rams advertised are 2 wheel drive models, the 4
wheel drive ones being relatively rare.
I currently have a 4 x 4 Mitsubishi, and have noticed that it is virtually impossible to drive it in snow when it is in 2 wheel drive, but is fine in 4 wheel drive.
I would be grateful for anyones advice / experience regarding the handling of the Dodge Ram in slippery road conditions. Is the 2 wheel drive model very difficult to handle in snow without snow chains? I don't go off-road, but should I opt for the 4 wheel drive model?
Does Dodge produce an SRT-10 in automatic, 4 wheel drive version?
What is the difference between the Ram 1500, the 1500 SLT and the Laramie?
Thanks in advance, Anker.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
anker thought everyone should know:

uh i personally wouldn't be taking a srt-10 out in any kind of slick conditions. that thing has the VIPER v-10 under the hood. that's nothing to sneeze at. 4wd is definitely helpful under slick conditions such as snow. but I've never had my 2wd not get me where i NEEDED to go. of course i live in the south and we don't see much of the white stuff round here....add to that my opinion that snow is only good for tearing up otherwise perfectly good vehicles and you see why i keep my butt home when its snowing *grin*
sounds to me like what you really want is a 5.9L v8 with 4wd for your winter weather. trucks are light in the back and as you have experienced not the most stable in slippery conditions. its the nature of the beast..keep in mind the higher the HP the easier it is to get it out of shape fast....of course this depends on the driver experience and habits also.
--
Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 01 Jul 2007 18:21:49 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

P/U's by nature are heavy in front and light in rear and can be dicey or testy on slick roads in 2wd. (Diesel trucks are the worst about this because of heavy engine up front). It is quite possible to do quite well with a 2wd P/U with a little preperation and thought. One is to loose any big wide tires in snow because they make matters worse and consider running a nice set is real snow tires on the rear. Next you want to add a bit of ballast behind rear wells in bed (between 300 and 500 lbs or about 120 to 220 Kg) as this will help a LOT. Actually a 2wd truck can be a pretty good tank in snow with right tires and weight combo. Case in point, I have been plowing snow for many years and own a few plow trucks and I very rarely ever use 4x4 when transporting from job to job and I get around just fine (and that is wiht about 800 lbs of plow hardware hanging on front too) What is my trick? Ballast and good grippy 10 ply truck type bias ply snow tires. Granted I run a lot more than 500lbs most of the time (at least 1000 lbs and some times as much as 3000lbs and more when loaded with salt) When I am carrying a good load (1500 lbs and more) I can even plow light to moderate snow in 2wd without any problems. The problem with depending on 4x4 drive all the time is that you have basically no abilty to steer out of a skid in 4x4 because all tires have to more or less turn same speed and their paths in a skid are different and since they cannot free wheel the break traction on a slick surface. The only good 4x4 system that is safer and predictable for this is a fulltime system that has a differentail between front and rear axle but no major brand US truck come with this today. (they have in past and I still have one that I have owned for 22 years and it was/is nice on slick roads) Granted you can drive a 4x4 and get by with 4x4 and no ballast with caution but you will pay a MPG penalty because Dodges made for last five years or so have no abilty to disconnect front axle from wheels (all models) and they are constantly dragging the ring and pinion and driveshaft even in 2wd and this adds up to a fuel loss of 1 to 2 MPG over all (worse when it is cold and lube is thicker) GM and Ford do not spin front drive shaft or ring and pinion in 2wd mode for what it is worth. Given fuel prices in UK I would tend to suggest making do with a 2wd unit. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually, the ballast should be centred over the rear axle, not behind it. Get a set (four) of dedicated good winter tires and you should be fine. I've driven in Canadian winters for almost 30 years and only recently bought a 4X4. Never felt I needed it. The only reason I got the 4wd was because I couldn't find a 2 wheeler with a manual trans. Bob
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Francis thought everyone should know:

you know I'm glad to hear that someone up north has been choosing 2wd over 4wd because they felt they didn't NEED 4wd. I've always been of the opinion that if its too slick for a properly set up 2wd then its too slick for 4wd. at some point stopping is going to be a factor.
--
Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Thompson wrote:

I'd much rather drive a 4wd on snow packed roads. I agree that 4wd does not help stopping. But it does improve handling. Most vehicles I've seen slid off the road were not trying to stop.
Chains on all 4 wheels, ballast in the rear, limited slip differential etc. will allow a 2wd to perform fairly well on snow but 4wd will do even better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a 89 4x4 burb that I bought new loaded with every option and 4x4 drive but I can honestly tell you that there has only been a hand full of times that I needed 4x4 drive in it to get around and it has been in some pretty serious snow out west. I can remember only once that I needed it in snow and that was on a forest trail in winter (and that trip is a story of its own) With some weight in the rear and good tires and a smart driver a 2wd can surprize you. My wife drive a 2wd Cherokke with a 4 banger and a stick that we bught new in 2000 as a daily commuter. During the winter I run studded snow tires on the rear and the vehicle does a great job in snow and ice. One of her freinds at work traded a minivan for a grand cherrokee several years ago and first winter with it put it in the ditch trying to comute in 4x4 on icy roads thinks they were invincible. They traded it off the next summer and went back to a front wheel drive. More than one person at her job scratches their head at how she seems to do better than them in 2wd on bad roads. Not sure if studs are ablicable here but when you run them on rear ther is not tendancy to spin out and suddenly trade ends on even the slickest roads. Very predictable. I run a set of 4 of them on my plow trucks in winter. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Studed tires are good on ice. But absolutly suck on wet pavement. Talk about swapping ends.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never even remotely have had that problem on wet roads and I have been using them for many years. Now I have seen some studded tires that are studded all the way across the tread and I could see where those could be maybe dicey on wet roads. I use ones that have two staggered rows on each outer edge part of tires and with none in center. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

you can't even begin to make this go away snotroll. studs definately change the amount of friction available on the raod surface over a non studded tire. the tire manufacturers, the stud man. and all of the safety information talk about that all of the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 19:30:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@whatever.net wrote:

Make what go away? You maybe??? I have lived with and used them for many years (on and off since 70's) and I know them well. As I have said I have seen tires that are studded all the way across the tread (years ago Cosco in MT used to stock them) but I have never used that style not would I recommand it unless you are in snow and ice all the time. Number15 or 16 studs (size of them) just on edges of tires is a staggered patern is a good balance between traction on ice and wet roads and you would know this to if you really knew what you were talking about rather than maybe reading a thing or two and calling yourself a expert. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Outer edge staggered.
Try to think of a good footprint of a proper inflated tire, with stud's protruding. On bare pavement what is making contact with that pavement?

Don't take my word for it. Look it up, the info is out there. Or take the Idiots advice and buy yourself some studed tires. But do get back to use with what ya do put on your truck.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roy wrote:

Studded tires are great if you live in an area thats mostly frozen all winter. Not that many places in the USA. North Dakota and parts of Alaska come to mind.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are a thrill a minute in rain soaked pavement. Now that I think about it, I wonder how, if used as the Idiot suggested, they would work with a abs truck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roy wrote:

I dont know why they have studded tires in places that aren't frozen solid almost all winter. In Flagstaff, AZ. many tire shops will put studs in. Sure Flagstaff can get deep snow and packed roads and highways. But it melts after 1 or 2 days between storms. Only people I can see that may want them would be those that live deep in the forests down dirt roads. Those roads stay frozen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

since
I would say that depending on the tire, it should be studs on the outer edge and rubber in the middle. If the entire tread is being held up be the studs, then that tire is a POS and is no better than a fully studded version so what would be the point of making it that way?

do
a
are
I have never needed snow tires with my truck but then again, I don't plow with it either and I don't see a real need for worrying about it here in NC.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Now you are getting the picture. That's why they aren't used much. I've not seen anybody with a set of studed tires on anything in years.
The stud is located on the tread so that it makes contact with the snow or ice covered road. To attain traction the stud is forced into the ice by the weight of whatever it is mounted on. When there is dry pavement the stud is making contact with the road. So your traction and stopping ability is deminished big time.
The Blizak with the super sticky rubber gives you both super traction in ice and snow and dry or wet pavement as well. But use in hot temps will use them up real quick. Also they should be used on all four wheels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then you ought to come on out to Oregon. The Californian transplants seem to love them since we actually get snow a couple of times a year. They still can't drive in the stuff, but they gotta have studded tires, since they are now in the "wilderness"! I personally think they should outlaw studded tires since they cause millions of damage each year to the road surface, and have no pratical value here.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

how long have you lived out "here in oregon"? studs seem to be pretty valuable in the ice, which is a more common thing out here than snow is. and even with snow, we end up with a crust of ice on top, and snow tires on ice are pretty worthless. studs are nice. alot of times it is either studs or chains or "no go". we chose studs. chains are a major pia. the nice thing with studded tires is when the weather changes, which it does everey couple of days in oregon, you can just take the studded tires off and put the highway tires on and go.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have lived in S. Oregon for 43 years and ice is not a problem here. In the mountain passes I have used chains on a two wheel drive on occasion. The Columbia River gorge, high desert area, or Pendelton area may have the ice problem you describe. Just how long have you lived out "here in Oregon"? The majority of Orgonians do not need or use studded tires. In case you didn't notice, this is a very large state. Heck, I'll bet they don't need them on the 300 miles of coastline, either. My original comments were in reference to people running studded tires in area where there is absolutely no need for them. If traveling to an area where they are needed, take chains and quit chewing up the roads.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.