Dodge Ram 1500 - 2 or 4 wheel drive

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wrote:


ok, i will.
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Robert Francis wrote:

Why's that? Placed behind the rear axle, it'll leverage a bit of weight off the front axle and add more than it's own weight to the rear axle.
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Because that "leverage" also acts as a lever to pull the rear end around the front of the vehicle in a turn and taking weight off of the front tires does not always help the situation, especially when attempting to turn in slippery conditions.
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I think you will find its almost impossible to buy winter snow tyres in the correct size in the UK. We are also not allowed studded tyres, I brought my truck over from Canada and ran it with winter tyres in Canada but just use the four seasons in the UK. I personally prefer the 4X4 and if you found your mitsu bad in the snow, the SRT 10 would be horrendous. Im selling mine now low milage 5.7 laramie 4X4 email me if you want details. Rob
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Exactly, TBone. Bob

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Robert Francis wrote:

I could see it if a pickup truck was already pretty well balanced, but it isn't. As Roy said, put the weight behind the axle "like when you have a plow up front." How about like when you have a Cummins ingot up front?
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Balance really isn't the issue in this case. If you could shift the existing weight from the front to the rear then it would make sense. To add weight behind the rear tires simply increases the mass and inertia of the vehicle which is always a bad thing in ice and snow. At the same time, you are removing some of the down-force on the front axle while increasing the mass and inertia created by that mass which makes it even harder to turn the vehicle. Roy suggested putting weight behind the rear axle in a plow situation to help unload the front suspension of some of the added mass of the plow hanging off of the front. Since the plow is in front of the front tires it also has that "lever" effect and takes some of the weight off of the rear axle. Putting weight behind the rear axle in that case counterbalances the plow and returns the weight back to the rear axle where it is needed. As for the Cummins, while it is heavy it is sitting over the front axle so there is no counter lever effect on the rear axle and most of it's weight is being put to use holding the front tires down.
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I would think that with the 900 pound's of engine up front, you have lightened the rear so a few hundred pounds in back might give a more favorable weight distribution in snow for traction purpose's. That's without the plow. A scale would help answer the weight issue.
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That depends on how the load is situated. If the engine is sitting in front of the front axle, then yes, it is lightening the load on the rear axle. If it is directly over the front axle, then it has no effect on the rear axle and if it is slightly behind the front axle, then it is actually adding weight to the rear axle. Since I don't own one, I don't know exactly where the engine sits in relation to the front axle. I agree that some weight may need to be added to the rear to increase traction in snowy conditions but as others have said, the weight should be directly over the rear axle in this situation.
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TBone wrote:

Weight behind the rear axle has that effect.

Weight directly over the rear axle also does that.

The vehicle wants to turn around its center-of-mass, wherever that is. You can't have the downforce that you want at either end without more inertia which you don't want... unless it's mid-engined and low-mass at both ends.

But that pig iron is also adding inertia in a turn. :) There's really no one right solution. Only after your mishap do you know where the ballast should have been that day.
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Yup. The only time you want weight behind the rear end is for compensatory weight, like when you have a plow up front.
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difference but the best thing you can do is get a "good" set of tires, and not bias ply tires either. Radials are much better in snow and ice. I run a set of Revo's year round and they do a great job plowing. They ain't worth a shit in slimy mud tho...
Denny
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Denny wrote:

My Durango came with Goodyear Wrangler RT/S tires. Tried them only once in the snow. They quickly packed up with snow and became round ice wheels with zero traction. Had 4WD but it was about useless. Changed the tires for Michelin Cross Terrains which are very similar to their LTX MS tires. Huge difference. Drove for a couple 100 miles through snow packed roads and the tires never once packed up. They stuck.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

2WD Ram. Id did fine, always got me to work on time, and home at the end of the day. The key is proper tires. I used a set of Goodyear Workhorse on the back for winter use.
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Chris, SnoMan and Bob, many thanks for your replies. The information you have imparted is very helpful, and I think I have now made up my mind and will go with the 2 wd.
Regards, Anker.
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It depends on the snowfall you receive. We receive heavy/wet snowfall due to lake effect from the Great Lakes. We can get stretches of bad weather with 4 to 6 inches of snow each day. We've had both a 2WD and 4WD. We prefer the 4WD.
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