electric brake controller 2001 Dodge dakota

Hello, I am trying to wire a electric brake controller into my 2001 Dodge Dakota Quadcab and I DON'T have the towing package. I have run a blue wire from my 7 pin round connector in the back to the engine bay
but I have to problems I need help with:
1. Is there anyway connecting the brake controller to my truck using the existing wiring? I don't have the towing package so there is no blue hook-up near the brake pedal for an electric brake. If there is no existing hookups that I can use then can anybody tell me which wire coming out of the brake switch that I should be connecting the brake controller to?
2. Is there a convenient opening in the firewall to pass the blue wire through?
Hope this makes sense. Thanks in advance!
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I don't have any specific wiring diagram for the Dakotas, but assuming it's the same switch as used on the Rams (no reason it wouldn't be), then you want to tap into pin #5 on the brake switch connector. Pin #6 should be +12V hot all the time, and obviously pin 5 is right next to it. Pin 5 should read +12V when you step on the brake pedal.

The clutch grommet is a favorite pass-thru to use for running wires, assuming you have an automatic - it will be either a sealed rubber plug, or a plastic cover plate. If it's a plug, just poke a hole through it. If it's a plate, you could either just drill through it, or it should unbolt, then you can drill it and install a grommet more easily.
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On Sep 8, 4:35 pm, "Tom Lawrence"

I downloaded the service manual and the brake switch/stop lamp harness is wired as:
1. Fused B(+)\ 2. Brake lamp Switch output 3. S/C Brake Switch output 4. S/C supply 5. Ground 6. Brake switch signal
If this is correct then I assume I tap into #6, correct?
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No, that's the signal wire to the PCM. You want to tap into #2, which is the +12V output. If you have the full service manual wiring diagrams, take a look at the trailer tow diagram. You'll see that the brake lamp switch output goes to the electric brake connector.
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On Sep 8, 5:37 pm, "Tom Lawrence"

Ok, the wiring diagram confirms what you have said, thank you. Now I have a problem with the actual colours of the wires. The colours listed in the wiring diagram don't even come close to the colours on the wiring harness. Should I just follow the posistions listed in the wiring diagram or do I have the wrong connector under my dash? The connector plugs directly into the switch that the brake pedal pushes on so I can't see it being the wrong connector, what am I missing? Thanks.
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On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 15:52:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Does this site help? http://www.etrailer.com/faq/wiring.aspx
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On Sep 8, 7:15 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It is not the wires for the trailer I am having trouble with, it is the colour of the wires in the wiring diagram vs the colour of the wires on the connectors that connecting underneath the dash to the brake switch. But thanks for the link!
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On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 15:52:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I would suggest that you use a pin to insert in the wire you think it is and use a volt meter to confirm it goes hot when you step on pedal. There is two reasons you want this wire, one is to signal electric brake controller and the second is that it back feeds power to it when you manually use electric brake controller so brake lights come on. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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signalelectricbrakecontrollerand the second is that it back feeds power to it when

Ok, I tried the pin technique and I found the hot 12volt wire and the output wire (they are the same as in the wiring diagram but just different colours). Thanks for the help everybody.
I am curious about something however, is the output wire only suppose to read 12 volts no matter how hard you push the petal or is the voltage suppose to go up the harder you push the pedal? All I got was zero when the pedal was not being pushed and 12 volts when the pedal was pushed. Is this correct?
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wrote:

signalelectricbrakecontrollerand the second is that it back feeds power to it when

That is exactly what it's supposed to do. That output is for the lights which is either on or off.
--
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wrote:

Yes and it is the electronic vrake controller that use this as a trigger singal to operate. There is two classes of controller too, one is striagth programable electric that you adjust and rate (rate of application) and max effort. The second kind is a proportional kind that sences vechile motion/decelleration and aplies brakes to trailer accordingly based on programming. The propertional kind seems to be more popular. Both have there ups and downs. The first kind can be mounted anywhere, the second kind have to be aligned with vehicles axis of motion and some of these are self levleing and some are not. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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