Fuel Filter

I recently found out my 2000 ram 1500 V6 has a fuel filter on the fuel pump in the fuel tank. A mechanic put it on the computer and the code came back
that something was wrong in the fuel system that was making it shake, rattle and roll. He suggested I change the gas cap but that didn't work. Why does dodge and some other manufacturers put the filter on the pump? If that's the problem it could costs $800 to fix.
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I find it very difficult to accept a diagnosis from someone who thinks a driveability complaint such as yours could be caused by the gas cap. IOWs, this "mechanic" has absolutely no clue how the gas tank is vented and odds are, no clue about the rest of the system.

Because debris in the fuel will trash the pump rather quickly.

I can't see why. That filter is available separate from the pump and the labor to R & R the fuel module can't begin to make up the difference in price.
Your best bet is to find someone who is not quite so overwhelmed.
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wrote:

The mechanic said the cap was deteriorating and I had read that if the cap is loose the engine may run rough?

I figured they had a screen or something on the pump but I meant an inline filter that could be easily changed out like they use to.

I was thinking that if you dropped the tank you may as well replace the fuel pump, too. I suppose I was thinking of having a dealer do it and the one closest to me charges $600 just for a tuneup.

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Who can tell the mind of an auto manufacturer?
My guess is they want to keep particles out of the fuel stream, and if the fuel pump is in the tank, the filter has to be there, too.
Eight bills sounds a bit high to lower a fuel tank and change a filter. I had some rotted fuel lines replace on my Blazer at Midas, one of the more pricey places. That was about three bills.
I've talked to several other people about Midas. They appear to have three level pricing. 1) the lowball price over the phone, 2) the written estimate, and 3) the real price, which is after they found all the "other things wrong". My job was priced about $50 - $150 - $300.
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First try to measure the presure in the fuel line, just before the fuel inyectors and if the pump doesnt rise presure then check the inyectors. I had a similar problem on my ex Dakota and the inyectors were the problem, not the pump.
CLT.
Ringer wrote:

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Thanks
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wrote:

If you think it may be the intake sock that is clogged, I have blown them off using an air hose to force pressure back through the fuel supply line. I f that fixes it then just add an external inline fuel filter.
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That's a great idea. Thanks.
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Ringer wrote:

I have a '01 Dakota. The parts should be pretty much the same, if not identical.
There are two fuel filters, one coarse filter at the pick up deep inside the tank. This keeps the electric fuel pump from sucking up trash out of the tank. The second filter is contained within the fuel pressure regulater assembly. It is much finer, and keeps dirt and stuff out of the injectors. The two filters, fuel pump, gauge sending unit, and pressure regulater are all one assembly, and sits on top of the fuel tank. Why? Because it makes the manufacturers job so much easier to have it all in one place.
To replace it, you have to either drop the tank, or raise the bed. Remove everything as one assembly, and replace the broken bits. According to Autozone and NAPA, the filter itself is not available, and you have to buy the entire unit for about $250. But the web sites are a little unclear.
The filters are long service interval units, and should never need to be replaced unless the testing procedures say they do. And the tests involve more than just hooking up a code reader. Don't agree to the work unless those specific test are actually done, and the results are abnormal.
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Thanks.
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