Fuel Pump

I read someplace that if your fuel filter is a bit clogged, it can cause the pump to overheat and shut down. I've been dealing with a very intermittant
problem for a few years on a 318 van and I'm thinking that it might be due to the pump shutting down. I tracked down a few other intermittant electrical problems and up untill yesterday the truck had been running perfect for about a year. I wasn't getting fuel at the engine so I eventually pulled the fuel line off of the filter input and ran a direct 12 volts to the fuel pump to rule everything else out. The pump didn't pump. But after sitting all night, the pump works. I guess the pump had enough time to cool down? My question is, if the pump overheats, does it normally take that long to cool down or do you think that my pump is intermittant? #2 - If I have to drop the tank, do I have to buy a special tool from dodge or is there some other deep drive socket out there that can reach the nuts. tia bg
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It would help if we knew what kind of vehicle you had.
--
Ken



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Nosey wrote in message ...

1992 B250 with 65000 miles on it 318
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Replace the pump. Steve

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Gear wrenches have always worked for me on the tank strap nuts. They also make a socket set (google either "gear wrench" or "gear ratchet"). I've also made a couple of extra-deep sockets by welding a pair of cheap sockets to either end of a length of 1/2" electrical conduit.
And yeah, I think your pump is toast.
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The Dodge fuel pumps used on their vans are only good for about 150K miles.
It seems to me the first time I had to drop the tank the nuts were rusted on so bad I had to cut the bolts. Bent carriage bolts work great for replacements with ss nuts. Replacing the second and third fuel pumps were a snap. A motorcycle jack works great for dropping the tank and raising it up again.
beekeep
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If you get the fuel out of the damn thing, it is as light as a feather. Now when I dropped mine and saw that carry handle molded into the top of it I have to wonder just how often they expected this tank to need to be removed. :-)
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving

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Not as often as the 90's Cheby S-10 series, probably.. I've met 3 people lately that got tired of dropping the tank and just cut an access panel in the bottom of the bed..
mac
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the
12
dodge
nuts.
on so

replacements
Dropping the tank is what I want to avoid. Beside it's a 40 gallon jobby and It's full. I don't have a way to store 40 gallons. Does a 40 gallon tank use a deeper pump than a standard tank? bg
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I have a 35 gallon tank on mine as well and have changed the pump twice. Strange, nobody around here knows Murphy's 5th law, when the fuel pump goes the tank is always full!
You're going to have to borrow some gas cans. There is an anti-siphon ball in the tank fill line. You will have to drop the tank a little and insert the hose below that ball to siphon it. Nobody here said it was an easy job, it's a real PITA.
beekeep
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