Fuel Tank Repair

I have a 1992 Dakota with what looks like a plastic fuel tank. What is the best way to patch it? I have two small holes in the front right corner.

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casabragg wrote:

Here's what I've done in the past to repair a number of cracked or broken plastic items, such as a snowmobile gas tank and a vacuum cleaner. Hopefully you have access to a Weller soldering gun. At least one of the tips that comes in the case is a flat blade which is tilted on a bit of an angle. Using a tie wrap as filler material use the blade of the Weller and melt in some additional plastic using the tie wrap. The heat from the gun shouldn't be nearly enough to worry about igniting anything in the tank. As I said, this has worked like a charm for me in the past....good luck.
Kevin
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wrote:

You want some Chemseal CS 3204 or some PRC PR 1422. These meet the old mil spec and aviation standards for 8802 which is the best fuel tank sealant made. It was deleveloped for usage with wet wings (wing tanks without bladders) and gas has no effect on it. I has been in usage for over 50 years. You can apply to stuff to a tank with a full fuel tank that is leaking and it will stop the leak right now and it will never leak again. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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SnoMan wrote:

JP4/JP5/JP8 goes right through 8802. I don't know what sealant you are thinking of but it isn't 8802. It makes a better weather seal than fuel seal. On the Hornets we shoot the wings with a foam like putty with a pressure gun. I can't remember the mil-spec.
--
Ken
F/A-18 FSQAR (retired)
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Lots of homebuilt aircraft are flying with fuel tanks sealed with 8802 and its predecessor 7502 and many of them use car gas. At least one homebuilt jet, the BD-5J has integral tanks sealed with 8802 and Jet-A isn't that much different than JP5.
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I stand corrected. It is commonly used as a fuel system sealant, but not on the aircraft that I worked on. My personal experience with the stuff showed it to be a piss-poor sealant for repairing tanks that are already leaking. Maybe because it's impossible to get leaking wing tanks clean and dry without taking the wings off and de-skinning them. That doesn't happen at the squadron level.
--
Ken



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On Fri, 7 Jul 2006 13:41:40 -0400, "Nosey"

If surface is greasy, 8802 will not bond well but but fuel does not seem to effect its ablity to bond when fixing active leaks when properly applied. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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On Fri, 7 Jul 2006 12:52:19 -0400, "Nosey"

Guess again, I worked is aircraft mod for many years and they used 882 all the time and so much that it was a regualr benchstock item. THey also to use it to temp fix fuel leaks on B52's. It is great stuff. Back in the early 80's I had a fuel tank leak that I could not stop and I put a tub of this stuff on while it was still leaks and it never leaked again. JP4/5/7/9 will not effect it at all. You are in error here because I have seen it used on it many times. ----------------- The SnoMan www.thesnoman.com
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