fuse problem???'01 durango

We have had some issues with the radio shutting down in the past but it always comes back on. Then on sunday we were on our way back from cali and I jumped a bump a bump nothing seemed to happen -why would it this
is an suv right? Then about an hour later the radio (which is stock) shut down, then the int lights stopped working, then when we took the keys out the car still dings. so we checked the fuses and the relays the int fuse was blown and when we replace it it pops instantly. The relays are fine except the int relay is making a clicking noise when you turn the headlights on. So I drove the car to the store and it ran fine (just no radio or int lights) the next morning when I went to go to work it wouldn't start!!! What has happened to my car? suggestions I have heard is that it's the voltage regulator or altenator or a plug has came unplugged. PLEASE HELP ME!!!
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Since the dome light is always hot, I would think some thing is shorted in that circuit. It could also cause the dead battery. Your going to need a wiring diagram. Since the radio was crapping out I would disconnect it & see if the fuse still blows. Or the radio could have been quitting because of the short ??? Have to start somewhere!
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sqdancerLynn wrote:

okay so my interior is in a million pieces we have unplugged everything and it is still popping the int fuse I agree about the dome light we'll check that after work today thanks for the help any other ideas??
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If you are able use a digital multimeter ($5-$8 from harbor freight) try measuring the resistance (with the battery disconnected) from the fuse connector to the frame and see if it is a true "short" (approx. 1-5 ohms) or a higher value. Then compare that reading with the resistance from the dome light to the frame, the reading in ohms that is LOWER should be closer to where the actual short is at in the harness. If they are about the same, and are a very low value there should be something obvious in that part of the harness or one of the harness connectors touching the frame. Make sure your meter has a fresh battery to prevent inaccurate readings. How long does it take to blow the fuse, instantly or does it take a few seconds? I often use a straight pin soldered to one of the meter leads to pierce the insulation of suspect wiring without damaging it permanently, the lower the resistance to the frame, the closer to the short you are and conversely, if the resistance is going up as you check the distribution from the fuse you are going away from the short, of course. good luck, Joe.
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Joe Brophy wrote:

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I made a tool to troubleshoot this type of problem. Crimp a spade connector to a length of red wire (about 12") Make another with black wire. Insert each into the fust position for each blade of the fuse. use a 12v light connected to the wires. I use a 12v drop light I have with alligator clips.
The light will glow bright as long as the circuit is shorted. When you disconnect something and the light dims or goes out, you found your short!
I used this on a Trans Am once that had a short in the dome light circuit that we ended up finding the problem had been created at the factory, but didn't show up until years later. The factory had pinched the trunk light wiring under a deck spoiler attaching nut.
After several years, if finally rubbed thru the insulation and shorted nicely to ground!
Curtis

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