help with my dodge please

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Which, coincidentally, is what a lack of fuel is, isn't it? The fuel delivery system in a Dodge has no direct monitoring. A failed pump will not show a code or an CEL. Thus, a code would show a problem with the engine management, not the fuel delivery system.
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Sorry Max, but you said that it will not monitor MOST fuel problems and it in fact will. Absolute fuel pressure is the only thing that it will not monitor but just about every other fuel delivery problem will cause symptoms that it can, hence the code he is getting. You are of course correct that he should get the codes before proceeding but to say that most fuel problems are not monitored is wrong. Now if you had said directly monitored, you would have been much more accurate but since you like to jump on me for crap like this, what comes around goes around.
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"Max Dodge" < snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net> wrote in message
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And in fact it won't. Here is a short list of what the PCM has no clue about: Fuel filter, fuel pump, fuel lines, fuel injector spray pattern, clogged fuel injectors, failing fuel injectors (it knows if it fired the injector, but it doesn't know if that event went well), fuel pressure, fuel leaks, grade of fuel, if water is in the fuel (the diesels know this, but not the gassers, AFAIK) or if the fuel is even capable of igniting, as in, varnished or aged.

Um, yeah, except the problem YOU mentioned first was a failed fuel pump, which is not monitored. This is directly related to fuel PRESSURE, which is not monitored. Further, if it was enough to get the truck going, but not enough to properly spray from the injector, there would be an atomization problem, which is not monitored.

Its absolutely correct. The only thing the PCM knows about the fuel is injector timing and A/F mixture via sensors.

Nah, I just jump on you for crap where you are wrong.
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it
Lean run condition
, fuel injector spray pattern,

Misfire codes
fuel pressure, fuel leaks,
These are really just repeates from above
grade of fuel,
Is not a delivery problem
if water is in the fuel (the diesels know this, but

Again, non of this is a delivery problem

It depends on what failed. A complete failure will not be detected but a partial failure (very low pressure) would show up as lean run and misfire codes.

Did you forget about misfire codes. It would also probably result in rich run codes that would be false but would indicate a fuel delivery problem.

And fuel delivery problems severe enough to cause running difficulties are doing it why Max, because it will cause the very mixture problems you just said so I guess that they are monitored indirectly after all.

If that were only true but we both know better than that. Have a Merry Christmas Max.
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A lean run condition doesn't necessarily point to the fuel system. On the chance that it does, it does not pinpoint a cause. As such, a lean run condition only points to a lean run condition, not a cause. From there, it takes a trouble shooting procedure to determine cause.

Misfire codes indicate that a cylinder did not fire correctly. It does not indicate why the cylinder fired incorrectly.

Unfortunately, they are not. They are problems unto themselves, not just symptoms.

Sure it is. If for some reason the fuel vaporizes in the line, (rare, I know) the PCM would never know it.

Unfortunately, you are wrong. Fuel varnish can clog injectors, stall pumps, and doesn't burn very well, if at all. If it doesn't burn, its not fuel, thus fuel isn't being delivered. Same is true of water in the fuel.

No, it depends on what you said failed, which was the fuel pump. And what you said failed, is NOT monitored by the PCM.

While true, both codes could indicate other problems. That is why its essential to get all info, since the fuel system will not show any dedicated codes.

See above. There are no dedicated fuel delivery codes.

OOPS, what did you say? INDIRECTLY? Right. INDIRECTLY, you could use the codes to find a problem, and THEN use deductive reasoning (troubleshooting) to INDIRECTLY find the problem in the fuel system. But there are no dedicated codes, nor any sensors monitoring, the fuel delivery system.

Who is we? I'd love to see a list of people you think agree with you consistantly.
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well all i have to say is WOW Andy

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