How to display error / fault codes 2001 Dodge Ram?

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While it's true that this function went away in '98, it came back in '00, and has existed ever since.
I suspect it's because of your CCD bus problems that you're not getting any codes. After all, the PCM communicates to the instrument cluster via the CCD bus.
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This probably isn't a high priority on your list but the weatherstripping can be tightened up by squeezing the weatherstrip channel with pliers. Don't crimp it closed too tight or you won't be able to get it back on.
--
Ken



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wrote:

On my '99 Durango slt 5.9l 4x4 I would get the "no bus" message in the trip odometer display when driving in stop and go traffic on hot days. The culprit was the PCM. It had developed a heat sensitive failure after about 30k miles. It would also shut down the vehicle and would not provide power to the coil until it had cooled off. Until I replaced the pcm I would carry a five gallon can of water to pour over it if and when it began to fail. I also did the front airflow mods on the passenger side front to help airflow in the pcm mounting area, as well as changing out the thermostat for a 185 degree unit per mopar performance. Allpar listed several cooling mods/changes like an improved fan shroud and swapping the fan with one with more blades from a viper but mine already had those from the factory.
Not any further failures since the pcm was replaced. A friend who used to man the Daimler help desk told me the cause of the pcm failure was hairline cracks caused from the PC board in the pcm heating up and cooling down hundreds of times eventually severing a circuit trace that would be fine until it heated up and expanded causing the trace to open slightly. The "no bus" error was generated because the pcm had shut down, ceasing communication with any of the other controllers in the vehicle, in this case the dash computer. I would also get error codes in the high 9xx range from the odometer readout. Hope this helps, good luck, Joe.
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First let me thank maxpower (aka Glenn Measley), miles, FMB, Nosey, TBone, Tom Lawrence, and Joe Brophy for the wealth of information and the detailed answers to my technical questions about the Chrysler Data Bus (tm)(C). My special thanks to Glen for giving me the encouragment to continue diagnosing this problem in my own driveway.
To recap:
2001 Dodge ram, short cab, 5.2L, 2WD, all options.
Truck ran fine one day, was parked overnight, there was rain that day and night, then the next morning engine would turn over but not start. After 2 days and some poking around (disconnecting/reconnecting various connectors) engine would start and briefly the guages worked for about a minute, then went dead, but engine could then be started at will after that.
When ignition is switched to on, odometer displays "no buS" and the overhead console displays "CCD".
Not having a proper wiring diagram, I focused on the wiring to the instrument cluster (MIC). There are 2 connectors (10 pins each) and after identifying all the ground and power pins, there were about 6 pins that were candidates for being "the bus". One of those pins was showing 40 ohms to ground, which I thought was strange.
I metered each of those 6 to the 3 connectors at the PCM and found that only 2 of them did indeed go to the PCM. As I suspected from examining much of the dashboard wiring, those wires are always a twisted pair - indicative of some sort of differential signaling, and I suspected they were indeed "the bus". One of those wires was the one showing 40 ohms to ground, and now I see it's showing 40 ohms to a third pin at the PCM (on a different connector).
Ok, so what I do next is this: with the 3 connectors at the PCM already off, I disconnect as much of that cable as possible. That basically means to disconnect it's opposite end from the main fuse module beside the battery (it's a big square connector with a hold-down bolt in the middle). Ok, I'm still reading 40 ohms - so what's going on? Under the truck, I disconnect a cable going to the transmission (it's got maybe 10 wires) and discover that one of those wires is the one making a 40-ohm connection to one of the bus wires (this is with all connectors still disconnected).
Ok, time to cut the main cable away from the firewall and remove all the black tape and physically inspect the twisted-pair bus wires. I do this all the way to the connector at the fuse module, and still get 40 ohms. The last thing is to take apart the square fuse-module connector. I do this, and as I manipulate the outer cover, the 40-ohm connection goes away. I manipulate the wires and manage to make the 40-ohm connection come and go.
I look closely at where the bus wires go inside this connector, and where the mystery wire to the transmission goes, and it turns out they're right beside each other. But what's really wierd is that there's no indication that they're touching. No corrosion, no chafing, no bared insulation. Very strange.
So I re-position the wires and close up and re-tape the connector, then re-tape the entire main cable back to the PCM connectors, and re-install all connectors and assemblies in the dash that I took apart.
Needless to say, the MIC worked fine, and no PCM or MIC codes were displayed when I tried the various diagnostic code reporting methods.
I'm thinking that this problem had nothing to do with the rain that happened the night before this problem started, but I still don't know why the engine wouldn't start during the early phase of this situation.
I'm glad I did this, and not simply take it to the dealership and maybe those monkeys wiggle something and the problem goes away only to come back later. At least now I know where to look if it happens again.
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Gee thanks but I didnt encourage you to work on it!!, but im glad you got it fixed. I still think it is rain related.
Also I wont to say that I am one of those so called " Monkeys at the dealer" Let me know when you have another problem!!

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wrote:

Impressive tracking of the wiring through the harness(s), what you didn't say (if you are a mere mortal such as myself) is the difficulty in following the factory diagrams in the manual.
I know if I had not been in electronics field service and thus some exposure to how multi page diagrams are organized in general, and that a manufacturer usually has their own "adaptation" of a wiring standard could have easily reached the frustration level where I just took it to the dealer.
Congratulations on a long (and more difficult than you made it sound, I would guess) trek to find the offending component. I say that while also looking over my shoulder in panic thinking that if you have not uncovered a "visible" villain, there is a good chance it will return. I hope not, maybe it was a miniscule wire fragment that fell out when you unplugged a cable from a socket or something similar that made the bug disappear. Even if you have it return, judging by the level of detail in your post you will no doubt get it sooner than later, again congrats. regards, Joe
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Joe Brophy wrote:

A few months ago, when I was picking up some front sway bar bushings for my 300m, I also wanted to get a service manual for it (Chiltons, etc). I have yet to come across any such manual for the late model LH cars. But I did find a Haynes manual for '94 to '01 Dodge Ram - so for the hell of it I bought it.
I had no problem following the wiring diagram in the book, except that it was way off the mark for my RAM. It must have been written for when the RAM didn't have an electronic instrument cluster. I went through all the diagrams and put together a picture of what the two dashboard connectors must look like, and according to the haynes book they'd each have to be 14 pins (instead of 10) so right off the bat I knew something was wrong.
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Not a truck technician but what you have is a total bus failure. there are a few things you can check. The C130 connector, the connector that is mounted at the firewall that feeds the inside. (Its a 43 pin connector) Since you say it happened when it was in the rain for awhile I would start there. Separate it and check for corrosion. There could be other reasons as well. A bad ground for the engine controller is possible. There are connectors below the dash at the Knee blocker that could effect this as well. Of course an engine controller could also be at fault.
Glenn Beasley Chrysler Tech
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Turn the key off-on-off-on-off-on. The display should then show any error codes present. It takes a few tries to get the timing of off-on right but it works.
MoPar Man wrote:

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miles wrote:

Let's say the ignition switch has these settings:
1) key-insert / key removal position 2) radio only position (one step counter-clock-wise from 1) 3) unknown (off?) position (one step clock-wise from 1) 4) Ignition/run position (one step clock-wise from 3) 5) crank engine position (one step clock-wise from 4)
I assume that for the off-on off-on off-on sequence, that "on" is position 4 and "off" is position 3.
When I perform an off-on-off sequence, the bell rings immediately. When I perform an off-on (and stay on) sequence, the bell rings 6 times, then the odometer reading flashes 4 times and changes to "no buS", then the bell rings 4 times then a pause and then it rings 2 more times (and the low-fuel indicator comes on).
When I perform an off-on off-on off-on (and stay on) sequence, the bell rings (or starts to ring) between each step, and at the end it does what I describe above (rings 6 times, etc).
If I have the "off" and "on" positions correct, then how long is the "off" time, and how long is the "on" time ?
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anyone looking for a pretty good old farm type truck? 1970 small block 4 spd. 2 ton on purple wave auction.com out of manhattan kansas. so far the bid is 550.00 looks to be a driver with not much rust. good floors and rockers. ksgp2

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replying to MoPar Man, thomas herron wrote: You can jump the ads relay
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On Sat, 12 Nov 2016 15:18:01 +0000, thomas herron

You REALLOY need to use an OBD2 scanner of some soirt.
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