One brake pad went down to the metal 99 Ram 1500

Friday while driving home, my drivers side brake started "roaring". I took it down to JustBrakes and they said the back side pad went down to
the metal but all other pads in the truck were just fine (had them replaced 2 years ago). He said the front caliper jammed up and needed to be rebuilt and the rotor was too damaged to turn (which I think was BS, it was just close to the tolerance) He also said the right rear cylinder (disc on front, drums in back) had leaked a little fluid because some paint was bubbled on the inside, but it was dry.
So the guy said "the bare minimum to make it safe" would be to completely replace the rotor, rebuild the front caliper and replace both back cylinders. He claimed that my back brakes were not working at all which I think was BS. The total would be $309 plus Tax but there was really more he wanted to do such as replace the springs and stuff. I asked what the cost on the rotor was and he said $150 "because dodge rotors are more expensive due to the bearings"
I said I don't have that kind of cash and won't until the end of the month so I said put the wheels back on and I'll park it in my driveway until then. I think when he took a micrometer to the front rotor it read 1225 and the other side was 1250 and I think he said 1210 was the "replacement threshold" and turning the rotor would put it too close to 1210.

were installed 2 years ago at Pep Boys.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If this were my truck (and it's not), here's what I would do.
1. Adjust the back brakes and otherwise leave them alone.
A little bit of paint bubbling around the cylinders isn't that big of a deal.
2. Replace both front rotors, both calipers, and all the pads.
If one caliper has locked up, the other one may not be far behind. If you only rebuild one, then there will be an imbalance in braking; not a good thing. Pads come in sets of 4. You'll pay for all 4, but only get to use the one that's replaced. If the rotors are flat, and not too wavy, there's not reason you can't refinish and reuse them. But if the pad has gouged big grooves in it, it should be replaced not matter what the micrometer says.
If you shop at Autozone, parts are a lot cheaper. Loaded Calipers $90 pair Rotors $66 each
--
.boB
Arrived: 2006 FXDI, Red.
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Thanks for the reply. The front caliper does move, I forgot to mention that, I think it just got stuck too close on the back side. The rest of the front pads have about 1/4 " left on them. The back is a little less.
The mechanic seemed to think that the pad on the back of the rotor was dragging for a while and now that I've seen the result, I remember thinking to myself recently that one wheel seemed to be getting dirtier than the other.
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Price sounds fair -- of course you can do it a lot cheaper yourself if you know how.
Replace pads on both sides.

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I've never seen a set of rotors come off a lathe that were still in spec for thickness.
If money is the issue, fix it yourself. Calipers: $20 each (+core), Pads: $25 set, Rotors: $42 each. $149 total for new rotors, calipers, and pads on both sides.
Change the brake fluid!!! It sucks up water over time and causes caliper pistons to seize in the caliper bores. If it looks dark in the master cylinder then it's time.
Keep an eye on the rear cylinders.
-rev
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Observe whats happening before servicing brakes!
One pad worn way more then the other usually (always) means the caliper is sticking.
When you use a clamp to push the piston back, pay attention to how much turning force it takes & compare it to to the other side.
Do both sides close to the same time so you have a frame of reference to compare. Open the bleeder 1st so old fluid does not
back up into the system. If you can`t get the bleeder loose, you will have to replace the caliper anyway.
On the rear, take off the brake drum, have someone apply brake while watching movement on both sides of each wheel cylinder.
If they both move & you have no leakage you don`t have to rebuild or replace (but its a good idea to)
Rotors can only be legaly turned by a shop to the min. for the vehicle. Min. is OK , thats why they have a limit.
Dick

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I would see what kind of warranty the place you went two years ago has to offer. I hear radio commercials that offer lifetime guarantee on brake pads.

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.. . ====Xclimation wrote:

====== "Lifetime guarantee" is applicable only when wear is "normal" or due to a manufacturers defect. (ever tried to prove a manufacturer defect??)
Guarantee is void when wear is proven to be caused by defective parts acting upon the gauranteed part.
Fact, not fiction.
though.....I personally have often, and most likely in every case will, offer to warranty the covered part if the customer agrees to repair all mechanical defects on the vehical that are acting upon the warrantied part.
:)
Now, given all that, I think the price he got was low if in fact the caliper is definately bad. And, I'm not convinced by a long shot that that's his problem.
Not only low..... but way low.
again, fact, not fiction.
~:~ Marsh Monster ~sips his crownroyal~ ~:~
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. . ============= snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

============ Regardless of what EVERYONE else has posted "up till now"........
If, and I do quote YOU, "all" the other pads were good, then the caliper is not definately the problem.
If you consider the facts of your post, that the other pads were fine, and apply basic brake theory of operation to the diagnosis of ONE "worn to metal" inner pad, then I wouldn't be jumping the gun, shooting from the hip, or otherwise making a "guess" that the caliper is causing the one pad to wear out. Consider the fact that the outboard pad was still "just fine". Brake rotor "run out", wobble, warp, whatever name you feel you need to apply, causes the pads to pulsate away from the rotor making a minor clearance. Though it is fact that the seal design of the caliper piston seal is such that the piston is retracted inward to the caliper, this alone is not enough to "pull" the inboard pad away from the rotor in that it's a very minimal amount of retraction taking place. The caliper piston is not only applying the inboard pad, but the outboard pad as well. With only an inboard pad wear scenario, further diagnosis should be given to why the outboard pad was NOT wearing as substantially as the inboard pad. Consider that the if the piston is binding, hanging, or otherwise restricted from retracting as to wear out an inboard pad to the metal backing plate.........then the outboard pad should not be "just fine".
so........
if your post is factually correct............
recheck the system and pointedly scrutinize the guides and pad retainers.
unless.....
yer post is'nt factually correct.....then disregard all my rambling.
as to yer back brakes...... fix the front, do a repost if you have any further problems, or...if you left something out, or, not.
~:~ MarshMonster ~takes a hit off his joint......wonders what yer definition of "jest fine" is~ ~:~
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Doing a complete break job on the 1500 RAM today, and that means replacement of everything. The drums, rotors, rear wheel cylinders, springs, seals, new pre-loades front calipers. Total cost for all parts $330.00 and about 4 hours of work.
120K on the Ram original rotors and drums turned once by self and a break job done at 56K. Present breaks have than a 64th of an inch material left on them.
On vehicles 20 years ago you could get 50K to 80K on a set of breaks but not today for the following reasons.
Todays breaks last 30K to 50K this is the average.
The average break operating temperature on older vehicles (20 years or more) was 350 to 450 degreed.
On newer vehicles the break operating temperature runs reom 500 to 650 degrees.
You can only get the rotors and drums turned once reguardless of vehicle. It is better to buy new drumbs and rotors.
2- new rotors $55.00 charge to turn two rotors $40.00 2- new rear drums $74.00 charge to turn two drums $50.00.
All said and done check your breaks every six months when rotating tires and there will be fewer surprises.
Coasty
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