OT: Blow Out

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Wow, what a way to top off an otherwise uneventful day at work.
I-10, 75mph, left lane
BOOOOOOOM!
Left front blows the tread right the fuck off! No warning, no
indication of a problem, checked the air pressure in all four this morning before head off to work.
I am ok, truck has some very minor cosmetic damage, i.e. busted mirror.
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On Tue, 15 May 2007 20:10:11 -0700, azwiley1 wrote:

WOW glad your ok....
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wrote:

I am friend, thanks for your concern. Tom L. I damn sure could have used your big bad CTD as the Lil' Bow Tie was hurtin' pretty bad today!
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Glad to read your okay. There was a rollover here that didn't end as well. It was caused by the same thing, the tread separated from the tire. the tv film showed the tread the grass, no tire. The truck looked like a toy 4 runner.
What brand of tire do you have?
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That would depend on what pressure was to begin with. Also you generally increase tire pressure for extened high speed driving. Many do not run enough pressure in tires and over time tire flex can heat tire and weaken it and cause sudden failure. 99% or the time barring a impact with a object on road, tires fail like this from overload/oheating (pressure vs load and usage) ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

What would you suggest for a tire pressure?
.Many

So you think that the tread jumping off the caseing is caused by heat brought about by underinflation?
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That would depend on vehicle and tires size and load on them and how it is driven

Yep you would too if you knew anything. Heat breaking down the bonding in tires between belts on rubber and it can get to point were it will suddenly fail. This is not to say that they cannot fail from bad design but failure like this are almost always the result of heat, tire pressure, speed and load. The dead give away here is that it blew while cruising at 75 MPH. It has long been a normal rule to increase cold tire pressure by about 10% or more for extened high speed driving (up to cold pressure limits of tire) I have seen some panic when there hot TP is above tire ratings but when they rate the cold prssure of tire, they know pressure will increase as tire heats up so hot pressure is not used to set pressure though some do. In nearly 40 years of driving I have never had a tire on my cars come apart but I have had a few bias ply trailer tires years ago loose their rubber on a hot day at high speed. Nice thing about a bias ply tire though is usually when you loose the rubber the "tire" still holds air so you can stop because the side walls plys are just as strong as tread unlike radial which tends to completely self destruct when there is a major seperation because sidewalls are weak and thin.

----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

How do you know what I do or don't know?
Heat breaking down the bonding

So if the tire calls for 32 pounds you'd increase it 10% to 351/2 pounds cold. Now that tire will increase how many degrees given the heat build up and the heat of the pavement? Use a m/t car so load won't factor.
> In nearly 40

Your point?
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wrote:

Sorry that should be pounds not degrees

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Easy to figure out by some of the ripe you post....

While road heat is a factor here, the main part of the equation is the heat the tire generates itself from flexing and this together with road heat determine when a tire may fail. When it is cool outside a tire can withstand a greater overload before it fails because it can disapate more internal heat into slipstream. A tire flexs as it rolls down the road and this flexing generates heat. Load capacity of a tires is determined by its construction. size and pressure and you increase tires size or pressure as load increases. As you increase the ply rating of a tire you either increase the plys and or increase the strength of the ply which adds to more heat being generated as tire flexes (a 10 play rated tires makes more internal heat than a 4 ply rated tire at 32 PSI because thicker stronger plies generate more heat flexing) Increasing tire pressure recues flexing under load and heat from flexing. Radial tires do run cooler and use less power than bias ply tires but they still generate some heat. A classic mistake is some with say 10 ply rated 245/16 tires rated at a little over 3000 lbs at 80 PSI run them at 30 to40 PSI or a bit more to improve ride but this also reduces load capacity because a 245/16 10 ply is only "rated" to carry a bit over 1500 lbs at 40 PSI. When you overload a tire it may take days, weeks or even months before it fails depends on load and conditions as a 3000 lb rated tires does no fail right away with 3500 lbs or more on it if it is at max rated pressure and if speed are below 40 MPH or so this amount a load and more will not really hurt the tire.Plus you can get away with low tire pressure in town/urban driving for months on end because tire never heats up as much as on highway. If we recall the Ford exploer farce, they tried to pin the blame of Firestone but the real cause was the lower pressures that Ford spec'ed for tires for ride concerns which weaken the tires over a period of time ( up to several years) untill they are started to "mature" in failure from this cumlative abuse. BTW I have a equipment trailer that uses 27 inch tall 14.5 inch rimmed 14 ply tires (load range "G" at 120 PSI) They can safely handle over 3000lbs a tire at 120 PSI and are rated to carry a lot more at lower speeds and/or shorter distances. I actually prefer bias ply tires on equipment trailers because though they consume more power and tend to run warmer and not wear as long. they have a very strong "body" and are not easily damaged by rocks or curbs even on sidewalls.

Knownledge and experiance that I did not get from a Sear's catlog or newgroups like you appeared to have tried too. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

You should be the last person to talk about posting, I think you ment trip.
<snip of more mind numbing stuff>
IIrc you took a tire that was manufacture rating at 32 pounds cold. Then you added another 31/2 pounds for a total of 35+1/2 pound'scold. That tire will very quickly climb up to 40+pounds once you start to highway drive it, more if it is 90 degrees or more. Do you think that would have a detrimental effect on the tire and suspension remembering that the manufacture said 32 pounds cold.
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wrote:

Damn now ya have me doing it should be "TRIPE"
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You missed one point here. I said increase it about 10% over suggested pressure for current load for high speed operation up to the max recommanded cold tire pressure. It is generally considered that if you have to run max pressure to carry rated load on tire in use before the 10% pressure increase that high speed operations should be avoded. This is why sometimes you see cheap car haulers and travel trailers with 3500lb axles and basically car tires on them eat tires because there is no reserve capacity in them as they are being used. For good safe high speed operation you really want to be at least 10 to 15 percent or more below tires rated capacity for ply and PSI being used ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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wrote:

No, your not answering the question I asked if a tire manufactrer said 32psi, cold, mt. You added 10% to it for a total of 35+1/2 pounds. Now we drive this puppy and the psi climbs to 40+psi. Does that increase of over 8 psi have a detremental effect on the tire and suspension?
Hopefully that is clear.
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As mud! <bg>
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wrote:

32
8
What is not clear is your question. Go back and read his initial post. He did clearly say to increase by 10% but NOT to go above the rated max cold pressure. Your question is meaningless as he never said to exceed the tires rated cold pressure.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



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wrote:

No foolish at 32 pounds increasing it mt to where he wants to go is crazy. If your truck or car is mt do you run it up to the max?
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wrote:

tire
it,
detrimental
said
we
over
cold
Ok, my days of claiming to know everything are long over. What in the hell does "mt" mean?
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



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wrote:

We never believed ya.<BFG>

C'mon Tom, say it fast, m/t! Empty!
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Roy wrote:

You're overwhelmed, Skippy. Bad troll attempt here, wait for another time.
--
The reasonable man adapts himself to the world;
the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.
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