OT legality of strobe lights on vehicles, plus rough ride

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I bought this pickup last fall, from a nearby municipality, it has only 35k miles on it despite baing 15 years old. They did not use it much.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Dodge350.jpg

1) about yellow strobe lights. Is it legal for a regular person to have these lights (when they are turned off)? What about driving with them turned on? I would presume that it is illegal. I am in IL.
2) It is a 1 ton truck and it bounces a lot, like on speedbumps and such. Is it simply due to having strong suspension (it is a 1 ton model), or is something wrong with it?
thanks
i
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ignoramus1729@NOSPAM.1729.invalid says...

I'm sure each state has its own regulations about lights. I'm in Ohio and you can use yellow lights when you have an extended load, instead of having a red flag on the end of the load. Also when you are plowing snow. My son is a contractor and uses the light on his truck that way.
Dennis
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On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 08:38:16 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@SPAMwowway.com (DT) wrote:

In ontario it must be a BLUE flasher for snow - and ONLY for snow.

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blue does not indicate PD there?
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On 01/02/06 4:53 PM, Christopher Thompson wrote:

In Ontario PD use red and white (with amber on some of the newer bubble gum machines) as do ambulance. Fire use red and white and sometimes have the addition of green flashers (green indicates part time firemen en route to a call but they must adhere to all traffic regulations including speed and traffic lights.
Blue is *only* used for snow removal vehicles (plows, backhoes, graders etc.) during a snow storm as blue light is easier to see in the snow. When spring comes around all the blue lenses are changed out for amber ones for summer use.
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On Wed, 1 Feb 2006 16:53:38 -0500, "Christopher Thompson"

ambulance. Voluteer firefighters have green. Yellow or yellow and white are used on tow trucks, wide loads, school bus roofs, and service vehicles of any sort parked in the roadway. Blue is snow removal only, and ONLY while removong snow. Don't be running down the road between jobs with the blade up and the flasher on!
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Same in Minnesota, blue is for snow plows.
<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message says...

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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message says...

In Michigan blue flashing lights are police only. Red for police and fire. Yellow for anything else.
Ken
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check on the specifics with your local vol fire department. or even a full time one. here in GA there is a form to fill out where you have to provide your valid reason for wanting them. then it goes through an approval process and you get a permit (if granted). keep in mind there are laws/rules that apply and you would need to research those also.
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I've always thought anti-collision strobes, appropriately shielded to avoid blinding other drivers, would be a good idea.
A lot of school buses here in Ohio have them mounted on top of the roof at the rear. I notice the flashing and slow down long before I actually see the buses, especially in reduced visibility.
Aircraft have them and they have a lot more room to maneuver than auto drivers.
Anybody have any thoughts about these and/or the turn signals in the middle of trailers on 18-wheelers? Personally, I don't see how it could hurt.
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Every State and municipality for that matter is or can be different and you need to check with them. A quick trip to the municipal building will answer your questions. Since the municipality did not remove them, it is probably not illegal for them to be there but I can't say what the usage rules (if any) might apply.
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*IN GENERAL*, a yellow flasher is kosher anywhere, being considered nothing more or less than a "Hey! Look out! There's a vehicle here that you might not otherwise notice" warning. About half of the carriers at the paper I substitute-carry for use yellow strobes/flashers. Some of them are more or less permanent installations like a county truck or similar, others use the "Kojak"-style bubble that mag-mounts to the roof and plugs into the cig. lighter, then gets tossed in the back seat when not on the route. I have yet to hear of any of them catching even the slightest flack from anybody "official" about them, despite paper carriers being "highly likely to be stopped" targets around here (northern CA) because they and drunks tend to be about the only source of boredom relief available for the cops between roughly 2 and 6 AM.
Red, blue, or white flashers, on the other hand, are (or are nearly) universally reserved for cops, firetrucks, and ambulances, and putting one on pretty much any other vehicle (never mind being stupid enough to actually light it up in traffic...) is usually a quick way to get a free overnight stay (at least) in the local greybar hotel. Green seems to be in a "grey area", legally - Some places don't care. Other places will jump on you with both feet.
Check with the powers that be *WHERE YOU ARE* for the answer that's right in your case.
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Thanks Don. I will check. I can always say that I sometimes use my truck to accompany WIDE LOADS.
i
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Depends a LOT on your locality. In NY strobes (or lights that flash in a strobe pattern) are illegal regardless of color if they are used on any vehicle not authorized as an emergency or hazard vehicle. Not sure how they are going to rule on LED style lights yet since so far nobody has asked.
For instance I am a fire police member. My vehicle can run one blue light for use while going to the station or to a call. Once on scene I shut down the blue light and have amber and red alternating flashers that get turned on to warn people about the incident ahead. The ambers are mounted in the front and both side windows the reds are in the rear and use the factory tail lights and a set of halogen lights mounted in the rear window.
1. No light, other than a white light, and no revolving, rotating, flashing, oscillating or constantly moving white light shall be affixed to, or displayed on any vehicle except as prescribed herein.
2. Red lights and certain white lights. One or more red or combination red and white lights, or one white light which must be a revolving, rotating, flashing, oscillating or constantly moving light, may be affixed to an authorized emergency vehicle, and such lights may be displayed on an authorized emergency vehicle when such vehicle is engaged in an emergency operation, and upon a fire vehicle while returning from an alarm of fire or other emergency.
3. Amber lights. a. One or more amber lights may be affixed to a hazard vehicle, and such a light or lights which display an amber light visible to all approaching traffic under normal atmospheric conditions from a distance of five hundred feet from such vehicle shall be displayed on a hazard vehicle when such vehicle is engaged in a hazardous operation. Such light or lights shall not be required to be displayed during daylight hours provided at least two red flags visible from a distance of five hundred feet are placed both in or on the front of, and to or on the rear of the vehicle and two such flags are placed to each side of the vehicle open to traffic. Such lights or flags need not be displayed on the vehicle when the vehicle is operating, or parked, within a barricaded work area and said lights or flags are displayed on the barricade. The provisions of this subdivision shall not prohibit the temporary affixing and display of an amber light to be used as a warning on a disabled motor vehicle or on a motor vehicle while it is stopped on a highway while engaged in an operation which would restrict, impede or interfere with the normal flow of traffic.
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A couple of years ago, I was stuck in traffic on southbound 101 going up the hill out of Tiburon before dropping down through the tunnel and over the Golden Gate bridge. Traffic was completely clotted and no one was going faster than 3 MPH. I was in the left lane (not that it was doing me any good) when I saw a car with a red light coming up behind me. I, and all the other folks in the lane, merged into the next lane (not easy in the backup) to let this guy through. Hmmm... An older Chevy Malibu with a red light inside the car above his rear view mirror. Never seen a car or light set up like that used by the cops.
I got on my cell phone and let the Highway Patrol know of my suspicions. I stayed on the phone at the request of the dispatcher, gave her the license plate number of the car, and told her which lane the car was in. As this guy approached the toll plaza he turned the light off, but there were two CHP officers standing at the toll booth. One of them stopped the guy, got in the car with him and directed him to the parking lot, where other cops were waiting. The other found my car, leaned in the window and thanked me. The other cops in the parking lot hauled the driver out of the car and cuffed him. That was the last thing I saw.
Who knows what else he had done, but it struck me that the cops take gratuitous use of a red light pretty seriously.
Peter
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Ayup... If you ain't a cop, ambulance, or fire truck, and show red light(s) to the front, you're effectively driving around with the equivalent of about a 40-by-40 foot billboard strapped to your roof that reads "C'mon, cop! I dare ya! Wassamatta? Too busy giving your K9 partner a BJ?" - And you're likely to be dealt with accordingly...
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Eh...depends. In Wisconsin, if you've got the lights and siren, and if they're both _on_, you _are_ an emergency vehicle, by definition. Those same lights in Illinois might be a problem, on or off. It varies by state at least. Galls.com might have a guide to all that crap maybe.
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wrote:

the question then becomes are you an authorzed emergency vehicle in valid emergency operation. i dont care where you are you cant run like your going to a call if your going after pizza, even if your in the pumper.
thus the reason for the emergency permit required in the state of Georgia.
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wrote:

Well, of course. Misuse of that sort of thing is well past "bad idea", well into "you get what you deserve".

Yup. New guys sometimes need to be reminded of that, and the "reasonable and prudent" clause as well. It's neither reasonable nor prudent, for example, to go 70 through town past the grade school, lights & siren or no; POV, or truck, or ambo.
After the first time or two they either mellow, or they don't get to drive emergency vehicles.

Here we need a letter from the chief, if a POV is being used with lights/siren.
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if the PD wanted to they could give you a ticket or worse weither the chief ok'd your use of lights/siren or not.

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