OT legality of strobe lights on vehicles, plus rough ride

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I have used strobes in plow trucks for years. Red and clear in the back and clear in the front marker. But ONLY while plowing. With them turned off? I suppose they could be any color as long as they are not functioning or used off road or on private property. When you have them turned on is when the problem of color comes up. Usually red or amber in the back and amber to the front is okay. Take a look at what the tow trucks in you area use, or call the DMV.

Trucks tend to bounce going over speed bumps.
Roy

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Thanks, Roy, DT, TBone, Christopher, John. I will check with my DMV. I suppose that as long as I do not turn them on, Ishould not have a problem.

I have a half ton pickup (also a dodge), but the one ton truck bounces insanely. Isuppose it is just due to strong springs.
i
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It may also have bad shocks. While the ride should be stiffer with a 1 ton, I don't know about bouncy.
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"Ignoramus1729" <ignoramus1729@NOSPAM.1729.invalid> wrote in message
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It is outright bouncy. I think that you have a good point about shocks.
i
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wrote:

it continues to oscillate after hitting the bump, then you have worn or inappropriate shocks.
One ton pickup's springs are - by my buttometer - a lot stiffer than half ton's.
Peter
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I get one very good hit when the rear hits the bump.

By my buttometer, as well. I guess that if a one ton load was in the bed, the shock would be a lot milder. (not that I want to try it)
i
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That's the nature of the beast, then. You can try - within reason - lower tire pressures. That'll help some.
Peter
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Toss 4 bags of concrete mix in the bed, it will ride a whole lot better.
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Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Four bags is not that much, I am surprised that you suggest that so little extra weight would help. Not that I know anything.
i
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That's 320 lbs. Just enough to get the springs off the 'full extended' position. Placing them nearer to the tailgate will be more beneficial.
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Anthony

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wrote:

I'd say your "buttometer" is working well. :-)
Harold
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That's the nicest thing anyone's said to me in weeks...
Peter
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Yep! I've owned several pickups---ranging from half to one ton. The one ton trucks are sprung heavily to handle the load. You'll be pleasantly surprised to find it rides quite nicely when you have it well loaded.
Harold
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wrote:

Thanks Harold... It makes perfect sense.
i
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On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 14:24:29 GMT, Ignoramus1729

Red or Blue lights would be a problem, because they are almost universally reserved for police and fire use only - even possessing the red or blue domes for those rotary beacons could be turned into an 'impersonating an officer' beef if they wanted to stretch it.
Amber lights are no problem if used properly - when the vehicle is used in emergency, construction or maintenance work, and they often stop in the middle of the road.
Go poke around at http://www.dot.state.il.us/ and see what the rules are. I'd say if you are worried get two flour sacks and cover up the beacons for now, or you can sew up two nice light covers in heavy canvas or Naugahyde with a draw-string bottom for permanent use.
I would have found it fast if they had the Illinois state site organized halfway decently... One nice thing about home, it's all easy to find online and cross referenced forty-seven ways.
http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/vctop/vc/vc_index_l.htm
Here's our law, look under "Lights and Lighting" for all the categories that are specifically allowed to have amber beacons - Disaster service workers, and a whole batch of various construction and maintenance vehicles.
But this is an important distinction - note that nowhere in the California codes is there anything that says you CAN'T have them if you don't fall under one of the permissive categories, just lots of categories that explicitly allow them. I can't see yours being that different, but you never know.
It all boils down to having a legitimate reason for /using/ them while on a public street or highway, like stopping behind an accident and providing assistance to the people involved.
IMHO I'd patch the paint but leave the orange stripes on the truck so the cop can see it's and ex-State vehicle, and the legality of the lights will never be an issue - unless you're dealing with a total asshat like Sheriff Buford T. Justice. And if the officer is out to hassle you and is looking for any chickens**t reason to give you a ticket, let it be the amber warning lights. That's an easy one to get a judge to dismiss.

If you want it to ride really nice, put a ton of dead weight in the bed. It'll smooth it right out... Yup, heavy rating, stiff springs.
Probably why it never got driven - it was issued to a department that never carried anything heavy (like the architects or engineers) and they never drove it because it rides like a buckboard when empty. Given a choice, they'd grab the keys to the sedan.
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Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
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wrote:

fyi: these covers are also avail commercially at www.GALLS.com

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On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 16:37:42 GMT, Bruce L Bergman

Thanks. I read what I could find there, and like in CA, there are many situations when they are required, but I could not find any when they are forbidden. I could always say that I sometimes use this vehicle to escort wide loads.

I agree. I am not terribly worried.
Regarding patching the paint, you are touching an interesting question. What is the greyish stuff beneath the white paint, is it primer?
Is there some cheap solution like applying some crap remover, and then spray painting large areas?

Its bed is full of dried paint. I think that they used it to get to a location, deliver paint and whatnot, and then it sat there all day long waiting for road painters to finish.
i
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On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 18:53:42 GMT, Ignoramus1729

Probably gray primer under white paint, but check the truck's body tag for the original color - It might have been built as a silver truck, then the state changed their mind and wanted the fleet all white and they had it repainted.
GTE did that - they got some really fast and cheap white paint jobs done. And it didn't help that some of the original silver paint jobs were rather tentatively stuck to the bodies in the first place... There were more than a few trucks that needed a full stripping down to primer and a proper second paint job done.

If it is primer and it's clean (no rust) you can leave the existing paint alone. You just need to hit the bad spots with fine sandpaper (600 or finer Wet-Or-Dry paper used wet) to feather the edges of the bare spot smooth and get some tooth for the new paint to grab, use the proper paint thinner to strip any wax oil or grease, mask it off, and paint it. Several light coats, build it up.
Any good auto parts store with an auto paint department can mix matching paint a quart at a time, and they'll have the right thinner/reducer and all the other supplies you need. Drive the truck there so they can see it, and they can even adjust the color to match any existing fading so you don't have to repaint the whole thing...
Too bad it's a Dodge. Rustoleum V2196838 (4TH68) Fleet White in the piss can matches "GM Fleet White", and it's great for masking the inevitable bed dings. It might be close enough to match on a Dodge.
And remember: It's A Truck - It's for Working, not for Looks. So what if the paint looks like crap if you study it up close. If it looks good when you back up 5 feet and it's sealed so it can't rust, that's all that really matters. ;-P
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 18:53:42 GMT, Ignoramus1729

If the bed is really lumpy with the dried paint, see about renting a heat stripper. If it is not so bad, get a used bedlinerfor $30-50 -- the paint underneath will stop the bed from ever rusting! about the touchups, try lightly sanding where the grey shows through, and spray a couple of light coats of white CHROMIUM primer, and where you see the metal -- tailgate and spots on rear quarter -- you should sand off the rust and use quite a few coats (comes in spray bomb -- can get it in stock usually in black and white, or order the right colour from most Napa type places) This type of primer sticks well and helps prevent rust. After that you don't really need to paint because this type of primer comes as a gloss.
btw, I love your truck -- great shape for a 86-89. Let me know if you come across another one with a slant six (225), 360, 400 or 440
rach
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The truck already has a rubber bedliner. The paint is not lumpy and I really appreciate having 1/8" of dried caked paint there, like you say, it is a greatrust protector.

So, if I go to Napa, I should ask for a "white chromium primer", right?

Ny 4 year old loves it too, it rides like a boat (until it hits a speedbump). The truck is a '90, by the way. It has only 35 thousand miles on it. My own 1999 dodge ram truck
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/packing/clausing/dscf0027.jpg
I had for the last 7 years, already has twice more miles.
I will eventually sell the '90 truck, but so far I drive it wherever I can. I bought it at an auction.
Here's a video of the Dodge 350:
http://www.algebra.com/~ichudov/spool/Dodge350.avi
Thanks for the primer suggestions.
i
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