OT: Log homes

Page 3 of 3  
Abby.Normal wrote:


Here you go, http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote2.html#ss2.3
Because that's the standard. Why should I place my response below the quoted text?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Abby.Normal wrote:

Oh boo hoo. Now pick up your balls and leave the playground. Net nanny wantabe.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's because people that buy dodge trucks have superior inteligence and knowledge on all subjects.
beekeep

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

John, trying to moderate this group would be like trying to moderate RMH! Pretty much anything goes over here too. If it were not for the OT posts, this group would be allot like a Victory group some of us are familiar with. Greg
(or over "there")
--
PoorUB
'05 Ultra Classic
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

really impressed. The thermal effienctcy wasn't all that great as I remember. Trimming them was a pain in the ass and because most of them come as a kit spare parts like that log you found down in the mud on the bottom of the pile and is all split and cracked. If it was me I'd build conventional frame with log siding If you want the look.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 9 Feb 2008 18:27:53 -0500, "Carolina Watercraft Works"

The only significant things I knwo are:
1. More difficult to sell on the used market sometimes (only certain people will entertain buying a log-cabin style home). and
2. If the quality of construction and design is not good, they can be a PITA to keep up.
Good side is that short of using stone, they are really solid!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PeterD wrote:

Dunno about that. In the mountains of northern AZ there are scores of log cabins. Several lodges, B&B's etc. too. Much has to do with how well of a foundation is built first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That may well be true, I'm in NH where we get cold (sometimes really cold) winters, hot summers, and even stick built houses can be problematic in that respect. Good foundations are vital too.
Personally I like log cabin style homes, there is one about five miles from me, about 4000 sf (yes, that big!) that is incredible. Built by a builder for himself, he went broke before he could finish it. The bank then sold it as partially finished, I've not seen it since it was done (went though it when they were selling it) but I think probably it has been finished very nicely inside now. I've often wished I could have bought it myself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PeterD wrote:

AZ mountains see summer highs in the 80's, occasionally 90's. Winters average about 20-30 with a few weeks at 10-15 below. Nothing like the northeast winters but cold to me!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The maintenance for a log home is more along the lines of different rather than more or less. As others have said, they do not have the best thermal efficiency and if not built correctly, can be a disaster to maintain. Making changes to them can also be much more difficult than making changes to a conventional home. If they are just interested in the look, as others have said, they could build a log faced home and have the advantages of both but if a true log home is what they really want, make sure that the logs are of high quality and fitted properly and they will have a home that will be much easier to maintain and enjoy. Make sure to fully plan out their wiring and plumming needs before construction starts because it is much more difficult to make changes to these in log homes once building starts.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TBone wrote:

It's common to build an outer traditional log cabin with a 4" inside conventional framed drywall. Same thing is done with brick homes. I have seen conventional framed houses with the 1/4 thick split logs or faux as some have said. Even seen mobile homes with faux log outer coverings. Seem to see those more often when cost is the deciding factor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, that is known sometimes as half log construction but as just about everyone who has ever owned a log structure knows, that it is just a stick built with a fancy siding and has little to do with a real log structure.

Again, a stick built with a fancy siding.

It has little to do with cost in most cases. Also faux and split logs are not usually the same thing although both equate to nothing more than siding. Log structures are unique and have very specific advantages and disadvantages to their structures and many who take the time to do the research find the disadvantages involved with a log cabin more of a hurdle than just the cost. Maybe that's not what you have seen but it is what I have, especially when someone who knows something about them explains some of it to them.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When built correctly, log homes have significantly more efficiency than a stick frame home. The R-values are lower, but it's a matter of thermal mass. Basically, the key to efficiency and maintenance is to be sure the home is built and finished correctly. There are some cheap kit homes (although just as many quality kit homes) and cheap hardware store finishing materials not specifically designed for log homes(stains and sealants) available that will not give you the quality. Also, kiln dried logs can now prevent the necessity for settling jacks (the turnbuckles previously mentioned). Chinking can last decades if applied properly but may not be necessary. Log siding shrinks as much as full logs and can be more of a headache because it is more difficult to build in compensatory systems. Also, log homes are much more durable. Here in Western Washington we recently had some severe flooding. Most of the homes washed away. Since it was not a flood plain these home owners are now homeless. One home that was right in the middle of the flooding is still standing: it is a log home.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Have you seen the log homes made out of cement? They look just like real logs with none of the real log problems.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

Most of the cabins around here are wood slatted rather than logs. They use logs only on the corners and for support beams for the roof.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.