OT: Looking for 12v Siphon pump

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What year vehicle? I was intending to do the same thing - fortunately, I had a 1990 Suburban at my disposal, which was easily siphoned... because I seemed to remember sometime in the early '90s manufacturers installing anti-siphon screens in the fill lines. Sure enough - sticking a host down my '95s filler neck proved that correct.
And since it was an emergency for me as well, my 1-quart suction gun was perfectly acceptable for starting the siphon running. You're just looking to suck some fuel out into a gas can - not plumb your tank directly into your generator, right?
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Correct me if I'm wrong... It is a thought that just came and may be totally off... I repeat: Just brainstorming... In my '93 Dakota 3.9 there is a service port on the fuel injection rail to check fuel pressure/depressurize for service, etc. What if one was to connect that to a properly made hose and use the truck's own fuel pump with the power switch to the ON position, engine stopped? Is it feasible? Is it safe? Is there a possibility to damage the fuel pump? Again, just an untested idea...
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In article

You'd need to leave the engine running, the pump will only run for a few seconds with the key on engine off.
Otherwise, you've got the right idea...
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True - but easy enough to make a jumper to replace the fuel pump relay, and apply battery voltage right to the pump. Actually, I'd make up a remote switch (some kind of hand-held device), with nice long (10-12') leads, so that I could easily turn the pump on and off while directing the hose right into the generator's fuel tank.
I wonder how much flow you're going to get through that little Schrader valve, though.
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it may take a while but you could do it with a simple remote starter switch and some spade connectors in the right ports of the fuel pump relay socket. tools most of us have on hand.
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That will work just fine provided the fuel rail on your vehicle happens to have a test port to tap into and not all of them do :-(
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"Christopher Thompson" < snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net> wrote in message
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97 Ram - you know, the one with the two brand-new cylinder heads...

Hmmmm.... hadn't thought about that. Will check that this weekend. I have ten 5-gallon cans, but in time of need that will only run the generator about 2 days.

Right. - although now that you mention it, plumbing the tank into the generator sounds intriguing ;^)
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I'll almost guarantee there's a screen down there. You could pull the filler neck off, and remove it, of course...

Hmmm... get a sump-pump-style float switch, drill a hole in the tank cap for the wire to pass through - put a little check valve in the top of the tank, and a connector for the fuel line. On the truck, wire in a connector for the fuel pump. Your generator should have a 12VDC output - you would run this through the float switch, and then hook that to the newly-installed connector, and pull the relay out (this prevents the 12VDC output from the generator from back-feeding to the truck's battery). Connect the fuel line to the fuel rail test port, and off ya go. As the level in the generator tank drops, the float switch trips, and fuel is pumped from the truck into the generator... when the level goes up high enough, the float switch shuts the pump off... the check valve allows air to escape as the fuel level is increased (may not even need it - if the generator's fuel cap is vented both ways, you don't - sometimes they're only vented one way, to alleviate low pressure in the tank). Now you have a 35-gallon (26 if you've got a short bed) fuel tank for your generator... very easy to disconnect (unscrew fitting on fuel rail test port, unplug electrical, put fuel pump relay back in, and drive the big gas can to the fillin' station).
Of course... if you let it run too long, you'll pump the big gas tank dry... then you're SOL :)
And if you really do this - make sure the float switch is gasoline-compatible (so the gas doesn't eat the plastic away)
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If it is a 97, he also has to check to make sure it has the test port. My 97 doesn't.
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"Tom Lawrence" < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net> wrote in message
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==================> Monster" > writes:

Let me tell you from experience, if you're intending to use the trucks tank as a storage device for long term fuel usage the theory is just not practicle in proof.
If you're planning on using the trucks tank for short term storage, enough to maybe run the generator for a day, then you should seriously reconsider the entire thing and simply use a 5 gallon portable tank.
Regardless, If you're set on using the trucks fuel (for whatever reason) then I would suggest you purchase the electric fule pump I suggested. They're not that expensive and you can rig it with alligator clips on a lenghty extension to hook it to the battery. The proximity of the pump to the vapors coming out of the tanks filler tube would be nill.....simply use long sections of fuel line to route to and from the truck.
anywhooooo....... At this point, I'm more curious as to why you would need to draw fuel from the truck to run the generator. It's my belief that if you own an emergency generator you should have at least 5 gallons of fuel on hand for it in the first place. My generator carries me for about 12 hours on 5 gallons. In hurricane scenarios we have plenty of time to stockup on fuel. I can see as where that could be a problem in "Tornado Alley" or maybe in case of an unexpected "White Out" or blizzard up north.
jest curious as to why you would need the fuel from the truck.
again, consider the electric fuel pump. You can make a homemade set-up that looks fairly professional for around $65 or so.
~:~ Marsh Monster ~sips his crown royal~
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5 gallons will run my generator maybe 6~8 hours tops. It's a GENERAC 1019 (7.5 kw continuous, 13.5 kw peak) - It's already wired into the panel via a transfer switch and with the addition of a hard start kit & 5 min. lockout timer on the compressor IT *WILL* easily run the central air (4-ton York 12-seer). But... it's a bit of a gas guzzler. I have 10 cans (5 gal each) but in an extended outage that will only run me 2 to 2 days. I was just looking for a way to hedge this operation (without burning down the garage).

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I picked up a pump that is powered by 2 flashlight batteries. Used it to pull 10 gallons last year without a problem. Bought it at a Abuchon(sp) store.
Roy
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writes:

Thanks Roy. Yeah, Auchon Hypermart. We have a few of those here. I'll check 'em out.
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