Removing transmission

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Have a 92 Dodge W250. The throw out bearing is starting to go bad. Has anyone here pulled the transmission and transfer case as a unit? How bad was
it? Would it be better to separate them?
Any hints would be appreciated.
Al, Dreading this. I may start going out for quotes.
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Its far better to seperate them.
--
Max

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I have never changed a cluctch on a Dodge, but I have on a Ford. If you leave the transfer case bolted to the transmission, the transmission becomes very hard to handle. This is especially true when trying to line up the input shaft of the tranny throgh the throw out and pilot bearings. The weight of the transfer case make it hard to keep the coupled pair hard to keep level and horizontal. It was very easy to R&R the transfer case.
Have you ever replaced a clutch before?
John
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Many times. I have a 4 post lift and a lot of time. Was just trying to get some idea what I was looking at. May rent a transmission jack and just have a go at it:)
Thanks to everyone that responded. The bearing first showed signs of a problem around two years ago. Was noisy when I first started the truck, then it shut up. Now it's really loud. I'm afraid it will lock up and really start damaging things. The clutch is fine but I'll at least change the disk while I'm in there. Can't help thinking the hydraulic clutch mechanism has something to do with this.
Al
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It's probably not, Al. All the "hydraulic clutch" does is replace the old, bind-prone mechanical linkage between pedal and bellhousing.
However, an improperly bled hydraulic clutch can, when the system gets warm from under the hood heat, hold pressure on a throwout bearing . . .just like it would be if you rode the pedal.
-- Budd Cochran

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So what keeps the throw out bearing from riding on the clutch fingers? I don't remember seeing a spring of any kind under there.
Al
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None.
By design there is supposed to be a small fraction of a inch clearance. This was seen in the mechanical systems as your pedal's "freeplay". When air is left in the system the air can warm up and expand causing the fingers to ride the bearing.
-- Budd Cochran

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Ok, by what design? The master cylinder is above the slave cylinder. Gravity would put some pressure on the slave cylinder. I don't see any way for the slave to back off the throw out arm. On an old truck with mechanical linkage, there are two springs to keep the throw out bearing off the pressure plate fingers. And, when adjusted correctly, it works.
Al

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Al,
I can only speak in generalities of the design since I don't have exact knowledge of your truck's design.
Some designs have springs, some don't. The same is true of the mechanical linkages.
Now, if your truck has been apart before, then maybe someone left off the springs. I don't know exactly.
-- Budd Cochran

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Budd is correct, many times in a hydraulic clutch design, the throwout bearing continues to ride lightly on the clutch fingers. It is assumed that as long as the pressure is light (gravity feed of fluid is very light) it will have little effect on th clutch.
--
Max

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. . .inline.. ========== ==========
By design there is supposed to be a small fraction of a inch clearance.
This was seen in the mechanical systems as your pedal's "freeplay". When air is left in the system the air can warm up and expand causing the fingers to ride the bearing.
--
Budd Cochran

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
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Set your own clothes on fire....

Budd was correct: Air in the line has an adverse effect on bearing release. Air in itself can act as a spring, as it compresses nicely, and decompresses just as well. Expansion and contraction due to heat is debatable, in that the effects could vary from none to more than enough to cause the bearing to wear more quickly than normal, depending on a circus full of variables.
Budd was correct: There should be a fraction of an inch of freeplay in a mechanical system. In a hydraulic system, not so likely.

That means I'm entirely correct, since you agree completely with that statement.

Assuming there is one, thats true. But there is not always a spring behind the slave cylinder piston. Secondly, the sole purpose of that spring is to be sure that the piston is fully extended to the clutch fingers at rest, so only a single stroke of the clutch pedal is needed to release the clutch. Its effects on wearing the throwout bearing are almost as negligible as that of gravity on the throwout bearing.
As such, if you are saying it has any negative effect on the throwout bearing, you are incorrect.
--
Max

Give a man a match, and he is warm for a short while. Light him on fire, and
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. . <inline> ========= =========
Here Max, hold still....while i set yer shirt tail on fire......
<snip>
Budd was wrong on so many levels..... and now your endorsing him.
<snip>
You on the other hand...are only partially wrong. The effects of gravity have nothing to do with the bearing apply. <snip>
It's the effect of that spring jammed in behind that "slave cylinder apply piston" that hold it all togeather. <snip> ======= ======= snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (MaxDodge) aimed his propane torch at Marsh and fired back:
Set your own clothes on fire....
Budd was correct: Air in the line has an adverse effect on bearing release.
Air in itself can act as a spring, as it compresses nicely, and decompresses just as well.
Expansion and contraction due to heat is debatable, in that the effects could vary from none to more than enough to cause the bearing to wear more quickly than normal, depending on a circus full of variables.
Budd was correct: There should be a fraction of an inch of freeplay in a mechanical system. In a hydraulic system, not so likely.
That means I'm entirely correct, since you agree completely with that statement.
(considering springs in slave cyl's.) Assuming there is one, thats true. But there is not always a spring behind the slave cylinder piston.
Secondly, the sole purpose of that spring is to be sure that the piston is fully extended to the clutch fingers at rest, so only a single stroke of the clutch pedal is needed to release the clutch. Its effects on wearing the throwout bearing are almost as negligible as that of gravity on the throwout bearing.
As such, if you are saying it has any negative effect on the throwout bearing, you are incorrect.
--
Max
Give a man a match, and he is warm for a short while. Light him on fire,
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Fix your quotes. I skip most of your posts because they are too hard to read. -- Ken
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You're not the only one. I'd much prefer reading a top-post (why the hell do people get so bent out of shape over that? It's easier reading, IMO) than the illegible lack-of-quoting (and over-quoting) that he does. "professional" mechanic or not, if you can't communicate, you're perceived as an idiot.
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So that's what happened to me.... I've been pondering that for years..
Denny
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Wow.... I've never seen a bigger target painted before.... Roy should have no trouble hitting that one! :)
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Gotta give him an easy one every once in a while or he quits playing..
Denny
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Thats too easy and ya know it.
Roy

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Heck, I won't even touch it . . . . . maybe
-- Budd Cochran

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