sagging leaf springs on 4x4 dodge

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Roy wrote:

Yes it requires a DVD DL (Dual Layer) disc and a burner thats capable of burning DL DVD's. I successfully burned a copy without trouble the first try. I read everyones comments about it online and just did what worked for others. I've used the disc for several months now. Works great.
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If the dealer doesn't get the right one, I may be looking for a favor.
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You might not be the only one :)
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And what exactly do you call all of your posts in this thread????

Really, what vehicle?? That sounds more like you picked a so-so rebuilder.

I do understand the properties of metal Miles, despite your whining and a good spring shop will understand them as well and do what is required to bring the spring back to factory specs. Now if you know so much and think that this can't be done, then why did you have it done yourself. That sounds kinda stupid of you to me.
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TBone wrote:

All one single post prior to this in this thread??? I only replied to your initiating a typical argument.

Several 1960's and 1970's vehicles. The results were so-so but better than nothing. It does not return the spring to like new performance. No way. Your comment about which rebuilder I used is without merit.

No you most certainly do not understand the properties of metal with regards to spring, hysteresis, fatigue, residual stress and far more.
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As usual, no valid answer. Sorry Miles, but I simply don't believe you.

Perhaps you are the one that needs to do a little research on this subject. There are two ways to have this done. Do you even know what they are?

LOL!!! Did you look up those terms in the dictionary. Please explain to us how each one applies to see if you really have any idea what you are talking about.
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TBone wrote:

And that means exactly what? Thanks for the compliment.

Theres more than just two. Theres quite a few different sets of steps different shops will use. Some better than others. Where you fail is your belief that an old spring can be made just as good as a new one and deliver the same level of performance and longevity. A rebuilt spring will do neither.

Hmm...with that remark its quite clear the terms I used were over your head as if they're something unusual. I've told you before where I work and what I do. Yes, I do know more about metals than you!
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It means that you can't ever answer even a simple question and are full of shit. If you want to take that as a compliment, be my guest.

Really, name them!

Yes there are but they still become one of the two methods but if you think that there are more, name some of them.

I said basically have a new spring, not have a new spring and there is a difference. If done correctly, it will be within the specs of when it was new and I never mentioned anything about longevity but if done correctly by a reputal shop, they should also last about as long as the origionals. Just slapping the spring on a press and bending it is not doing it correctly but you knew that, right????

Now that depends on what was wrong with it and exactly how it was rebuilt. Really Miles, you are beginning to show that you don't know anywhere near as much as you claim to.

There is nothing unusual about the terms and all I asked was that you relate them to the discussion which you once again failed to do. Sadly, there is nothing unusual about that either.

No, actually you haven't said where you work and only hint at what you do.

Really???? You don't act like it and you do know that aluminum and steel have very different properties when it comes to flexing, right??????
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TBone wrote:

I answered, you whined.

Most do not heattreat for instance. That can make a huge difference even though you might call it a simple step.

Not so. Unless the spring was just sitting around without use and not subject to corrosion then there is no way it can be returned to like new condition delivering the same level of performance and longevity of a new one. By you disagreeing it's clear you have no clue!

I gave my frigg'n website to which you whine about quite some time ago. Geez TBone, see a Dr.!!

Gee Really? Gosh!! Did you know that metal that has been flexed for many many years gains residual stresses only some of which can be taken out through heat treating which many shops don't even bother with? You knew that right?
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No, you didn't. I asked for what cars and you gave some crap about "many" cars from the 60's and 70's with as usual, nothing specific at all. How many cars Miles and specifically what models.

Once again, it depends on what method they are using and once again, no answer to the question of other types.

LOL, and this from the one who can't answer even a simple question. If the spring is that badly corroded then it is not a candidate for either rebuilding method and only a second rate shop would work with it.

Once again, no valid response. Why didn't you just post it again? The answer is because you never did, at least not to me or in this NG.

Actually Miles, that is not completely true. Unless you bend spring steel beyond it's stress point, it takes no damage and can theoretically be flexed like that forever. And then again, if one of the leafs is damaged due to corrosion, it can be replaced. You knew that, right?!?!?!?!
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TBone wrote:

Oh geez TBone. What the hell difference does it make if its 3 or 10 cars or a Skylark, GTO or a Mustang (yes, those are 3 of them)? You just wanna bitch about nothing!!

Oh? So as an old spring flattens out or loses it springiness it did so without anything really happening huh? Now that right here shows your lack of understanding of basic metal properties. You're making an assumption that is clearly wrong. My company produces whats called load cells or force transducers which rely on the very predictable bending properties of metal. The companies that rebuild springs are one industry that uses them. Look it up. Yes, I do know far more than you in this area.
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The difference is that you claim to know that the procedure does not work well and then claim to have done it to several cars. That would make no sense unless replacement springs for the cars that you did it to were unavailable and that is not the case with the three you just mentioned so you are either pretty stupid or just ripping people off that you sold these cars to.

I never said that.

LOL, no Miles, it shows your inability to understandthe difference between a single item and an assembly.

Once again Miles, that would be you. You are under the assumption that the entire spring is defective and that is not always the case.

Yes and if that is true, IIRC, you also claim to work primarily in the aircraft industry where the aluminum alloys used there have very different properties than spring steel.

Really??? Exactly what do they use them for on automotive springs?
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On Feb 19, 8:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Sha Zam) wrote:

Yes, have them re-arched, but I also added an extra leaf on each side..much improved (cost about $350.00 at an independent frame and spring shop)
Charlie The OC '01 ram 1500 4X4 quad cab
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On a non-Dodge vehicle I had years ago, I was able to take apart the spring pack. And replace all but the big, long, main spring. It was still a heck of a lot of work, but less than replacing the entire spring pack.
I got the replacements at a wrecking yard. A plug in impact wrench paid for itself that day. For the U-bolt springs, I heated the nuts up with an acetylene torch. Stick the impact wrench on real quick, and hold the trigger down until the nut came off. The other spring, a friend and I had done the entire job with hand tools. The impact wrench made life a lot easier.
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Christopher A. Young
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