Salt spreaders

Anyone here have any experience with any of the larger salt spreaders (for pickups) for ice/snow control? Looking at stainless steel models.

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Laszlo Almasi
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Laz, we sub it. Found that it was to much of a pia to store it. Then ya need to keep a loader there to refill it, the loader needs to push too.. We use a company that does highway sanding and he makes a pass through as needed.
But Fisher has a poly hopper out that you might want to look at. www.fisherplows.com
Roy

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I believe that there is a company in Maine called Downeaster that makes thse items.

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And where you live that makes sense but here, snow is not much of an issue. Ice is the big thing here and if you want to make any money, then the ice is what you need to be able to remove.
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Carolina Watercraft Works wrote:

Laszlo--
I'm a week late in posting, but since no concrete info was conveyed, I'll put in a remark:
I think what you'll find is very much standard: the contractor I work with has ended up buying whatever the best deal was at the local contractor's supply house. For the past 5 years, we've rotated Monroe products into our fleet, and they seem to be as good as anything else. The sand available in the area is rather coarse so we cut the inverted vee above the track to about 2/3 to 1/2 its original spread to promote good flow. The only other mod we do is to install a tractor light in the "spread" circuit, aimed down from the chute so as to help us to monitor the spreading. We grease the units twice a month or so, and when it gets warm enough, we rinse 'em out. At the end of each season, we follow a good washing with a light spray of oil on the conveyor so that it works again next fall. If you pop for stainless in any model, I just want to remind you that a lot of the components are still mild steel -- the chains, the bearings, the conveyor....the stainless units we had were on a far larger trucks that were mounted through the season -- the higher cost of a large unit just needed to be spread out over a greater number of years. However, the only benefit I saw in the stainless unit was that it only LOOKED better after 3 or 4 seasons....Honestly, if you show the machines a little maintenance, you'll be at the end of the their useful lifetime by the time you rot through a box or any structure in a 1 to 1.5 yard unit.
Remember -- we're talking about work during a cold, wet, and usually dark time -- so you can get sophisticated with your selections and your setup, or you can keep it simple. Only you know what's best for you, not me or your salesman.
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