Snow Tire Recommendations?

I need a tire recommendation. Two winters ago I was tooling around Amarillo in a Dodge Dakota with Bridgestone Dueler A/T's. They had no problems handling the conditions I routinely faced there. Last
winter, I had just bought a Cummins 2500 4x4 Ram and was immediately called up out of the reserves to go to Iraq. Now I'm back and discovered this winter that the current set of factory tires wil be inadequate for the conditions I face there this year. First hint of ice, and the truck turns into an Ice Skate. I understand this happens to any vehicle on ice, but some tires offer a little better grip then others.
With that in mind, I'd like to toss out my working conditions and see what some of you are using and recommending for winter conditions on your 2500/3500 Rams.
I am the manager at a wind power plant outside Amarillo. In the winter, we get lots of rain, and our site roads are dirt/caliche, which can get very soft. I also need to deal with snow, and more importantly, ice; because Amarillo frequently gets ice storms.
Thanks.
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I'd check out Michelin LTX M/S. An excellent all around tire and these are what I use when I plow snow. There are times that I wish I had a dedicated snow tire and do plan ongetting a set to use only for plowing since I too run into ice a lot. For that, I plan on getting Blizzak W965 tires.
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The Ltx m/s tires were very good. I first had the LTX A/S, not good at all
Right now I have BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A dale
On 12/24/06 11:37 PM, in article 3kKjh.5020$ snipped-for-privacy@bignews8.bellsouth.net,

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wrote:

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Suddenly, without warning, Carolina Watercraft Works exclaimed (25-Dec-06 4:07 PM):

I bought these tires based on recommendations from this ng, and I'm very happy with them. Truck did beautifully in Scotland recently (darn, was going to post a link, 'till I realized I never posted the pics). Anyway, they closed the road behind me, ice or unplowed road, windrows from the sometimes 90mph side winds, and some snow around 1.5" or more deep - the truck did fantastic, we didn't end up even coming close to the ditch, like some unfortunate Nissan pickup owner did partway down the road.
Now the truck's in the desert, and the tires are gripping pretty well on the fine dirt/sand here in Outback Australia.
I've never plowed before, so I can't comment on that.
jmc
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On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 01:37:03 -0500, "Carolina Watercraft Works"

Part of the cause the problem original poster is having is because truck is very heavy in front compared to rear and while a better tire will help, so will more weight in rear. If you place it on a scale you will find close 5000lbs of weight on front axle as it sits and maybe about half that in rear or a bit more unloaded. Better tires and about 800 to 1000lbs in rear between wheel wells would help a good bit. When you have a lightly loaded driven axle pushing a much heavier one you will have issues on slick pavement though some may like to claim it is not a factor. Also I have driven with blizzaks on a vehicle and they are not bad but I preffer studs for the really bad stuff. I run studded 10 ply bias style truck snow tires on my plow trucks in winter (I have them mounted on extra sets of rims) and they beat blizzaks in over all performance on ice and deep snow. Granted the tires are low tech compare to radials in some regards but they are withfew if any peers when it really gets ugly plus since sidewalls are as strong as tread ply wise you will be very hard pressed to damage sidewalls on hidden object with the bias plys plowing snow while is not hard to damage a radial sidewall sometimes. In well over 20 years of plowing I have tried a LOT of tires and on a whim I tried a new set of traction grip studded bias ply truck tires on some old extra 16.5 rims about 4 years ago on one truck and was so pleased I bought a set for other. I will never go back to a radial on plow truck in winter. Sure the handling is not as crisp and they are noisy but those tires are really sure footed and the stiff side walls really help the big edge cleats molded into tire and the studs in them dig in when needed. ----------------- TheSnoMan.com
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Oh God the idiot is back
wrote:

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wrote:

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He should be outside playing with snowballs
On 12/26/06 6:48 AM, in article

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wrote:

I don't know why I'm doing this. but....
If you are useing the weight as compensatory weight, you move it behind the rear wheels. If between, a goodly portion of the added weight is transfered to the front. Kinda look at the rear wheels as a fulcrum. Of course if ya use the weight that suggested you can't use the back of your truck and you'll be blinding everybody while driving at night.
But this whole exersise is moot with the right tire.

Nah, this would be a waste of time. Let me say this. If you plow snow most learn to do it correctly real fast. I've found that while plowing you should be behind your plow, it is on the front of my truck. You have any idea what I'm driving on while plowing? Yup, a fairly well scraped road or parking lot.
The danger with stud's is you can't stop on dry pavement or wet at speed over 15MPH. Well, you'll stop eventually. I don't know if this fool has them on all 4 wheels or what.
Much easier to use chain's than studs if you feel the need.
Idiot, please spare us the stories of the howling blizzards and other stories. Been there done that.
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wrote:

You know, if he is soooo good, I'd like to see him and his studded tires in a Buffalo, NY lake effect snow storm that dumps 84" in 36 hours.

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wrote:

That's just it, he isn't. 84" in 36 hours? Sorta give the term plow with the snowfall a whole new meaning.
Roy

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wrote:

Hell, that gives new meaning to damn near doing anything in a snow fall. Yeah, it was like 3 or 4 years ago that Buffalo got hit. I have a pic or two of it I will get scanned in and online.

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I guess you named 4 different conditions. The only tire that will come close to dealing with all is the Blizzak imo. They are the best one ice and snow(the most dangerous of your conditions) given the sticky compound of the rubber and sipeing of the tread. They are good in rain and on dry. The only knock on them is they are a dedicated tire. When it is warm out you have to take them off as you will burn the tread off of them. Like everything else it is a compromise.
Roy
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Thanks everyone. Normally I would go Roy's route, and have a dedicated Snow Tire. I used to run studded snow tires years ago and loved how they gripped. This year, sotrage space concerns will prevent me from getting a dedicted pair of snow tires.
I'll look at the recommendations tossed out here. Thank you, everyone.
Jay
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I guess my last post thanking everyone managed to go on vacation, because it hasn't posted yet. Thanks for all the advice.
I used to work for Firestone/Bridgestone as a mechanic many years ago when the Blizzaks were introduced. Great tires, but I'm guessing they will wear out too quickly in Amarillo considering the miles I put on my truck. They would have been great when I was up in the Cascades, and the snow stayed on the trails all winter long. Great winter tire, I agree. If I had the time and space, I'd keep a set on spare rims and swap them out as needed. I'm afraid that I'd burn through a set before the season was out. I'll take a good look at them tomorrow. Last time I worked for Fire/Bridgestone, they only had one model of Blizzak, and they didn't go on trucks. I'll probably take a look at the Michelin LTX M/S also.
SnoMan, I used to run studded tires on my buick, but I don't think that will be practical in this caser. I see a lot of HD trucks running around in these tough conditions without them so I think they won't be necessary. I simply find it tough to get a bead on the make model of the tires being used when they're spinning on trucks blazing through the snow/mud.

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The Blizzaks that Laz mentioned, the W 965 are designed for a truck your size. They are have very small blocks, with a bunch of sipes. You can get them in load range "E" which is something to look for with the others as well. I don't know what you run for temps out there but I used mine from Nov. to April with no undo wear here in MA.
Good luck!
Roy
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Twix wrote:

toyo at's or mastercraft at's and cooper atr's all good in snow all resably priced
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