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Actually no, you are the one that seems confused.

Water vapor and steam are not exactly the same thing. Do you know the difference?

Water vapor disperses through the air and may be considered weightless however, I don't recall many ships sailing in vapor, do you? Helium is actually LIGHTER THAN AIR and that alone makes it different..

LOL, steam usually has liquid water in mechanical suspension and that makes it heavier than air. Put liquid helium on any scale under normal atmospheric conditions and it will have weight. Put helium gas on that scale under the same conditions and it will show nothing at all.

No, you didn't because water vapor can be and is part of the atmosphere and helium is not.
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What happens to water at 212F? (Of course, at 14.7 psi here... don't want you getting carried away)

You seem to be caught up in the fact that if you can't measure it, it has no weight. That's false. Again, weight is a measure of gravity acting upon a mass. If the mass doesn't change, and gravity is constant (it was, last I checked.... hang on.... <THUNK>... yep, constant), then the weight doesn't change. Just because the material in question won't hold still on a scale, doesn't actually mean it's weightless.

So now gravity only acts on those gases that are "part of the atmosphere"? You're saying gravity is prejudiced?
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Yup. Same difference between helium as a gas, and helium as a liquid. If steam has weight because its water vapor, then so does helium as a gas.

Ok, so now WATER is weightless. Jeez, and all those diets to get rid of water weight.....

Depends on just how rough the seas are.
Helium is

Steam is ALSO lighter than air, but its no different, it has weight, just like helium, and just as air does.

Then how does it rise?

Pure unadulterated bullshit. See Tom L's example of the ice cube.

Really?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth 's_atmosphere#Composition
Better take a look at this, they claim it IS part of earth's atmosphere.
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Funny... a concept so simple I didn't think to question him on it till you brought it up. I wonder where he thinks atmospheric pressure comes from in the first place? I mean - SOMETHING's gotta weigh something to generate that 14.7 pounds per square inch...
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He forgot one basic fact of physics... everything has weight. This basic fact is why man started wondering why birds could fly. There HAD to be a countering force.....
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W R O N G!!! Everything has mass but if you were in a point in space where there was no gravity or the force of gravity was negated by another force (perhaps the gravity of another mass), there would be no weight.
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Do you have birds falling out of the sky? If not, there IS a countering force.

Thus everyhting has weight, even gaseous helium, which has mass.

Um, no. But do feel free to explain this.
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LOL, it is nothing more than the definition of weight and weightless. If we go by your hard-line definition of weight as the attraction between two separate bodies (gravity), then you have proven yourself wrong on your freefall theory because that force (gravity)exists, free-falling or not. I find that definition of "weight" as meaningless because it serves no purpose, but is good to hide behind when you are afraid to think outside of the box.
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Are you now saying that steam is a liquid or are you just spinning because you don't actually know the answer.

Are you now saying that water vapor and liquid water are the same thing?

Really how. Are you now saying that a rought sea is actually vapor, LOL?

Prove it. What is the density and atomic weight of steam?

Who say's it rises? Perhaps some of that rising you see is due to the energy imparted on it from the pressure and temperature but steam does cool off. Helium doesn't depend on it's temperature being greator than that of the surrounding gasses to rise.

No, you just don't understand it or know that you cannot weigh it this way which makes it weightless by definition. http://www.hyperdictionary.com/search.aspx?define=weightless

LOL, different web sites say different things.
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Here's a couple other sites for you: http://www.ace.mmu.ac.uk/eae/Atmosphere/Older/Atmospheric_Gases.html
http://atschool.eduweb.co.uk/kingworc/departments/geography/nottingham/atmosphere/pages/atmosphericgasesalevel.html
http://www.uigi.com/air.html

Are you now saying that steam is a liquid or are you just spinning because you don't actually know the answer.

Are you now saying that water vapor and liquid water are the same thing?

Really how. Are you now saying that a rought sea is actually vapor, LOL?

Prove it. What is the density and atomic weight of steam?

Who say's it rises? Perhaps some of that rising you see is due to the energy imparted on it from the pressure and temperature but steam does cool off. Helium doesn't depend on it's temperature being greator than that of the surrounding gasses to rise.

No, you just don't understand it or know that you cannot weigh it this way which makes it weightless by definition. http://www.hyperdictionary.com/search.aspx?define=weightless

LOL, different web sites say different things.
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No, I'm trying to understand what you are saying. See, I was taught that assuming the MASS doesn't change, and GRAVITY doesn't change, it didn't matter if something was solid, liquid or a gas, it would weigh the same in any form. So a gallon of water weights the same whether its ice, water, or steam. Same with helium, it weighs the same whether is solid, liquid, or gas.
So now, you claim that gaseous helium is weightless. Well, gaseous water must also be weightless, as it always rises. So if my science teacher was right, and everything weighs the same given the same quantity of the element, and you are right, helium is weightless, then helium must not weigh anything at any time. So if helium is weightless, and steam has the same behavioral characteristics, steam must be weightless. If steam is weightless, and ALL forms of the element weigh the same then water must be weightless.
Unless of course you are wrong, and helium does weigh something when in gaseous form?

Yeah, sorta like your liquid helium and gaseous helium are the same. They both weigh something.

Sure why not. Lets see where you go with this one.

No need for desity of steam and atomic weight of steam. The proof that steam or water vapor, which is lighter than air, has weight is called..........
Wait for it.........
RAIN.

Wait, lets go back to that mechanical suspension of water vapor. Is that a twin I beam, IFS, or solid axle. Coil or leaf springs? Four link?

I do. Steam rises. Pretty easy to prove, go boil some water.

No, water vapor cools off, steam is steam.

Ok, what DOES it depend on Mr. Wizard?

Ok, so to follow your definition, it LOOKS like its weightless, but its actually got weight? Are you now spinning or back pedalling?

But it IS part of earths atmosphere according to the three differeent sources I found.
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I'm stupified here.... do you REALLY believe that? Helium isn't dense enough for gravity to act on it, huh? Holy shit! In the words of Casey Kasem... "ponderous... f'ing PONDEROUS"....
Helium doesn't posess any special anti-gravity properties, Tom... it's just that the air around it is MORE dense, and pushes the helium up... just like the oil in salad dressing pushes the vinegar to the top.
Please explain how matter can have mass, but not have weight. Given that gravity acts upon ALL matter, I find this concept, err... intriguing.

Since there is no atmosphere surrounding the moon, both the helium and the CO2 will sink to the lunar surface.
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You really need to work on that comprehention here Tom. I think that we can agree that weight is a force and to define it closer a downward force. It is also known that helium gas does not stay in the atmosphere as shown by the link I provided. If the only way out of the atmosphere is up and weight is a force pushing it down, it becomes clear that if helium does not stay in the atmosphere, it must have no weight.

But if that were all it was, then the outer atmosphere would consist of helium and hydrogen and that is not the case. Not only is helium so light that it rises to the top, gravity has so little grip on it, that anything at all can tear it away so for all intents and purposes, it has no weight.

Because weight is a force and if other forces around it negate it, it has no weight

Actually, if that were true, the moon would have a full atmosphere of it's own but it's gravitational force is simply not strong enough to hold any gas against the force of the solar winds so in reality, it would simply float away (no weight). There actually is a reason why the moon has no atmosphere.
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So...... um....... sorry...... I'm laughing to much.... can't think straight....... Tell me again why steam has weight and helium doesnt? Wait..... does hydrogen weigh anything? How about neon? If lead were in a gaseous state, would it be weightless?....
Wow....... I just can't do this anymore.....
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I'll agree with you on your thought processes but I doubt it has anything to do with laughing.

Where did I say what steam weighs?

It has less density than helium so you figure it out.

Nope, neon is heavier (atomic weight) than both nitrogen and oxygen which make up around 99% of our atmosphere

I doubt it. Why don't you try it and find out?

What do you mean "anymore". Like you ever could.
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I know, but do you?

Exactly. And helium has an atomic weight as well. SO no matter how ya cut it, helium isn't "weightless" like you claim..

I know hte answer, but you obviously don't, considering that you think helium has no weight in its gaseous state.

You're right, I never could convince you of anything thatmade sense, you've always stuck to the crap you believe, like weightless helium.
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Since I just said it, I guess that I do.

LOL, is there a reason why consistantly make an ass out of yourself. Atomic weight is not the same thing as actual weight, you do know that, don't you?

If you knew the answer, you would have said it. IOW, you don't have a clue. Helium has no weight in its uncompressed gaseous state on this planet because the density of the air that makes up our atmosphere applies more upward force to the gas than gravity can supply to pull it down. Since weight is a net force in a downward direction, if the forces going the other way are stronger, you simply have no actual weight.

You can't convince me because 90% of the time, you are wrong. Helium is weightless on this planet because the forces pushing it away from the surface are greater than gravity trying to pull it back. Weight is a measurement of force toward the planet, not the objects mass.
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I'm well aware that its different, but you claim its weightless. Well, if it has an atomic weight, then it has one form of weight. And if it has mass, it has another sort of weight. But you've claimed it has NO weight. So I figured I'd better cover all bases here, and see if you were talking atomic weight, not actual weight. Apparently not. So you are saying that helium has no actual weight. And thats wrong.

Um, I guess you haven't figured out that I'm asking stupid questions to see how stupid an answer you will give. See, you think gaseous helium is weightless, and thats just not true.

There are NO forces pushing it farther from the surface of the planet. Its very simple, something heavier is displacing it because that heavier gas is being pulled by gravity, just like helium is. Same theory makes a ship float on water. The ship is less dense than the water by virtue of the fact that its full of air, so it floats on the water.
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LOL, the fact that you just said this shows that you really don't have a clue.

Wrong.
Weight is a measurement of downward force and if something has no measurable downward force under a set of conditions, then it has no weight under those conditions. That is the difference between weight and mass.

No, what I'm seeing is you spin once again because you got called on your BS and have no other way out. Gaseous helium is not always weightless but on this planet in our atmosphere, it is. Even on the moon, which has no definable atmosphere, the gravitaitional force of the moon cannot hold it to the surface so it is for the most part, weightless there too.

Then why does it rise?

LOL, anf the only way something can be displaced (moved out of the way) is by a force. No force, no movement.

Yep, but the hevier gasses are being pulled harder and their mass is pushing the helium up and away, effectivly negating the force of gravity, (the one force that gives something weight) and if this force is overpowered, the weight must be zero or less.

Yep, which makes it buoyant or weightless while it is floating in the water because the water is supplying enough upward force to cancel out the force of gravity. If it could not do that, the ship would sink (fall to the bottom).
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Weight is a measure of gravity on a mass. Period. You're big on definitions - try this one:
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=weight
"The force with which a body is attracted to Earth [...] the product of the object's mass and the acceleration of gravity" *
Okay... now start in with the "yeah, but"'s, and the, "downward force"'s, and everything else to deny this simple fact: just because something floats in the atmosphere does NOT mean it's weightless.
* Actually, to be entirely correct, this should read as the inverse of the object's acceleration - as an object accelerating at the rate of 1g has no weight... but an object accelerating at the rate of -1g (ie, going against gravity at 32ft./s2), weighs twice as much.
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