Transmission Radiator cooler

Anybody know which would be the in connection to the radiator from the transmission on a 94 Dodge Van B250 5.2l? I had to rebuild the tranny, and want to flush the radiator before I connect
it all back up.
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wrote:

I'd flush it both ways... Maybe twice, if the tranny failed in a messy way.
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I was told to mix dish detergent with tranny fluid to assist in the flush. Ever heard of that? I can't see where it could hurt anything.

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I don't think dish soap will mix well with trans fluid ! I would use a solvent like mineral spirits or you can buy pressurized cans of trans cooler flush from your local auto parts store.
http://www.bulkpart.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=2&Category_Code=cooler-flush
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wrote:

You are kidding right? Please, put a <g> on all jokes.
Uh, no do not mix dish detergent with (whatever) and try to clean the cooler core with it!
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Have found a Trans line flush in a spray can. But still would like to know which is the input line to the cooler. Recommended to flush in that direction.
Drivers side, or passenger side on the radiator.
Anybody?

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I found this; Warning for all Dodge Rear Wheel Drive Overdrive Transmissions Except 45RFE
#1. On Dodge 1994 up RWD transmissions the check ball in the cooling line is bad about sticking or becoming clogged especially after a transmission failure. This can happen even if you flush the transmission cooling system causing overheating or even a second transmission failure. The cooler line we're talking about is the return line on the bottom right of the radiator. All of the above information doesn't apply to the Dodge Hemi. We sell the parts to replace this cooling line without the check ball. Chrysler no longer makes this cooling line. You can only buy the whole set of high dollar cooling lines from them. This cooling line should be replaced after a major transmission failure.
#2. The transmission cooler in the radiator looks like a filter inside. It should always be replaced after a transmission failure. You can have a radiator shop install a new transmission cooler in your radiator. The problem here is it can't be flushed clean even with a power flusher. You can be fooled here, it will appear to be flowing good and after 1/2 hour of driving it will quit flowing fluid. This will not only overheat the transmission but will stop the fluid (oil) flow to the gears and bearings causing a total melt down. We have seen people go through as many as four transmissions before the problem was found.
So I assume I need to get another radiator.
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Don't know, where did the above info come from ? Do you know for a fact it is accurate ? Do you know if it even applies to your vehicle ?
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Here is the link. http://www.eatmyshifts.com/warning_for_all_dodge_rear_wheel.htm

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Did the trans grenade and put metal shavings throughout the system or did it just wear out from old age ? If you just overhauled it because it was slipping or had hardend seals I wouldn't worry much about it and just flush it real good. On the other hand, if it was a catastrophic failure that put metal shavings throughout the trans then you might be better off to replace the cooler. If you do have a catastrophic failure it can be next to impossible to get all the trash out of the stock cooler. If the radiator is still good you can install an aftermarket cooler that mounts in front of the radiator. Yhis may be a better choice anyway if you haul heavy loads or operate in high ambient temps.
Never heard of the check valve in the cooler lines but I would also flush the lines as well to make sure there isn't a problem with them. I assume it would be easy to test for a check valve by using compressed air on the cooler line. It should only flow one way.

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You could say it grenaded. The tranny had the yellow markings of a junk yard. Must have used the old torque converter, as that was, what I was told, took out the tranny. The pan was full of metal shavings that almost covered the whole bottom.

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That's not good as the fluid goes from the converter to the cooler then back to the pan. I would not use the stock cooler after a failure like that, it would be impossible to get all the metal out. If it was mine I would install an aftermarket cooler in front of the radiator. If you go with the aftermarket cooler do not use the plastic fasteners that go through the radiator as they ruin the radiator after a while. Either get one that has a seprate mounting braket or just make your own bracket.
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If you want to be totally sure, yes, have a good radiator shop install a new cooler in the radiator.
However, if you install an appropriately sized external cooler, available in many sizes and at far less cost than the radiator, you can do away with the cooler in the radiator.
There is in fact a check ball in the present cooler lines.
Flushing the cooler in the radiator must be in the reverse direction. However, if the failure was particularly ugly, swapping out the cooler is a good idea.
--
Max

"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, he is not entitled to his own
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You need to flush it in both directions to remove as much debris as possible. You should alternate flow between normal flow and back flush until the flushing fluid comes out clean.
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the transmission is the return line, at least on my Dakota.
Ken
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