Vented Tailgate - (Dodge Ram '07)

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Does anyone actually know if a vented tailgate actually helps increase gas mileage? Any if so by how much? Any information would be greatly appreciated, Thanks.
Shane
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Shane wrote:

Decades old question that has been long since answered. A tailgate down or removed will actually increase the trucks drag rather than the expected decrease. In tests I have seen the resulting mpg change is negligible. If your intent is to increase mpg then you'd be wasting your money with a vented tailgate. If anything it would go down but more likely no measurable difference.
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Thanks to everyone who responded it really helps with a new baby. I don't want to be spending any extra money if it's not going to help me save any money in the long run. What is everyones thoughts on a K&N (http://www.knfilters.com /) products would anything like that help me get more MPG or would that be just a waste of money too? I really don't care too much about the MPG if if it's a drastic increase I wouldn't mind adding it to the truck. I used to have a diesel and I was putting $90+/- a week into it now I'm only putting $60+/- a week and that has been saving me a lot of money already.
Shane
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Save your money and dont waste it on the POS k&n filter. All hype pure bullshit.
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azwiley, TBone, FMB, Roy... Thanks for all your input after reading everyones comments it sounds like I better off not getting any of that and put my money towards gas.
Thanks again,
Shane
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azwiley1 wrote:

The filters are junk but their CAI is ok and can improve performance on some vehicles. However, I prefer other brands such as AirRaid. For permanent filters I prefer Wix or Napa Gold.
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Huh? Maybe if the engine is modified and the speed is close to 100mph.
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Roy wrote:

There are some vehicles that can benefit from a better air intake especially going from a hot to a cold intake.
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Where is this cold air coming from? Usually from the engine compartment. Anyway no matter where it get's the air it travels through a tube that is hot as hell, so any cool air is now heated. The getting isn't worth the going on a stock engine imo
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Roy wrote:

How about outside the engine compartment?

Yes but depending on the material used any transfer of heat in the split second the air travels through the tube is negligible. Some of the all metal single layer tubes I suppose could conduct too much heat.
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If it is a forced air setup, the engine's gotta be modified and should be at about 5500 or better rpm and have a speed better than 75mph.to assist the cold air such as it is to the intake imo.

As is any performance increase you might realize in a stock engine.
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Roy wrote:

Roy, what is your point? Are you saying that the old fashioned air cleaners that sat above the engine and drew hot air from INSIDE the engine compartment is just as good as a ducted system that pulls in air from outside?

Cold air from outside the engine compartment can give gains on many vehicles which when stock pull hot air from inside the engine compartment.
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That it is a waste of money on a stock truck.

If you are talking about a cowl induction from days gone by I'd venture that the cowl induction is better. Direct shot of coldd air into a carb.
If you are talking about today, by the time the "cold" air travels through the filter and through the hot tube to the tb it is no longer "cold" and not of much if any benifit to a truck running along at 2500-3000 rpm that is having it's air fuel mix controlled by a 'putor.

Here's the thing Miles, the air is not pulled in it is forced into the filter by the speed of the truck. If the speed of the truck isn't in excess of 80+mph there isn't a whole heck of a lot happening.
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Roy wrote:

That simply isn't true at all. For that to happen heat would have to conduct rapidly through whatever material was used for the duct. You would be correct for some of the cheaper thin walled plastic that could conduct heat. However, the better styles are double walled or made of thicker materials that don't conduct heat all that well. The air is traveling through the duct much too fast to heat up appreciably.

What type of truck are you talking about here? Very few trucks have forced air intakes. We are talking about stock trucks. They are not forced. Cold air drawn in is preferable to hot air from inside the engine compartment. A proper duct will not conduct significant heat to the air being drawn in.
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Really??
Let me try again. The material that the tube is made from is going to aquire the same temp. that the rest of the engine does, or darn close to it. That heat will transfer through the walls of the tube so that the inner wall that the air is passing through is also the same temp. Now you introduce air that has already been slowed by the hot filter and then has to proceed through the tube to the tb. Seeing as it isn't a forced air induction there isn't a heck of a lot of velocity moving it. What makes you believe that this air is moving so fast that it won't pick up heat from whatever it travels through? The air will pick up a bunch of heat as it passes through the filter and tube. Thus the gain in performance or mpg compared to factory is going to be nil imo.

Exactly !!

Sure it is. But you aren't going to get there by changing the tube and that is pretty much what you have done. Heat is heat whether or not it is the factory tube of aftermarket

You are saying that a tube heated for a hour or so in a stock truck in normal driving won't transfer the heat to the air that passes through it with zilch for velocity?
Miles, I played with forced air on drag car's years ago. True it is now old tech, but pretty much the same deal.With a hood scoop and a velocity stack sealed to the scoop, good for maybe 1/2 second in the 1/4. That is on a modified engine at wot. That is with cold air being stuffed dirctly into the carb through a cold 6" tall velocity stack with no filter at at all.
You won't see that on a stock truck under normal use with a your tube and filter. You won't notice a mpg change that will offset money spent on the tube and filter imo.
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Roy wrote:

No Roy. The engine metal temp is much hotter than the compartments air temp but I assume you meant air temp.

With that logic your homes A/C would not work. It travels through duct work often through attics that can get quite hot. Here in Phoenix my attic can get well over 120 degrees yet I have nice cold A/C coming out of the ducts which travel through that temperature.

It takes time for the air to heat up. How long does air take to travel through the duct in your view? Again, with your logic your homes A/C would not work very well. The velocity produced by the A/C's fan on say low isn't very much. The engine does draw in air more than fast enough.
Tell me Roy. Why do so many auto manufactures install ducts to the outside of the engines compartment when doing so costs extra money if according to you there is nothing to gain?

I change the duct from one that draws air inside the engine compartment to one that draws it from outside.

zilch velocity? Hmm. Guess again.
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Yup!
We aren't talking about a/c. We are talking about the benifit of this setup on a stock daily driver truck.

I disagree.

For the same reason they put big assed decals on them and tell people they are fast.<G>
Some do, some don't.. DC didn't with the Charger SRT8, and the SRT boys were after all the go that they could get.
But this is a stock truck, remember.

Hmmm. Answer the question. No heat transfer after the truck has been operated for a hour or so.? Where are you getting all this velocity after the filter?

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Roy wrote:

The length of time is irrelevant. Heat is heat and the ability of that heat to transfer through the plastic enough to heat the air running through the tube is negligible especially if per you it would take an hour.
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Your splitting hairs miles I said the drive the truck for a hour. Drive it longer. The continueing heat transfer is still there. No where is the velocity comeing from.
It still won't help a stock truck.
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Roy wrote:

The heat would have to transfer through the tube wall fast enough to be able to heat the air passing through it in the time that air spends in the tube. It makes no difference if you drove an hour or 5 hours.
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