Punto Active Service Schedule?

Hi
I recently bought an 03 registration Fiat Punto 1.2 Active. Unfortunately I've checked my docs and I can't seem to find a service schedule i.e. how often I need to service my car.
I'm currently at 17500 miles. When should my next full service be? How often after that do I need to service?
many thanks
Brett
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brett snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

I would guess every 12000 miles - at least that's what our 2001 Brava is. So 24000, 36000, ...
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Thanks for that Alan. 12000 is what I assumed, just wanted a little verification!
Cheers
Brett
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brett snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Or 12 months whichver is sooner.
Mike
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mine is a Punto 1.2 16V Sporting (' 00) and needs to be serviced every 20000 kilometers (how many miles is that?), or once a year. Ciao!
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1 Mile is 1.6km so 20,000km is 12,500 miles
Offically Fiat in the UK operate a 12,000 Mile or 12 month Service Schedule with a low usage/mileage option.
If you have an overhead cam belt driven engine then the chances are your manual will suggest a 72,000 mile (115/120K km) belt replacement interval. I strongly suggest you adhere to 50,000 miles/80,000km OR 5 years (which ever comes first) replacement schedule. And when you have the belt replaced have the tensioner and static belt stretchers replaced as well. From what I can gather it is the tensioner and static belt stretchers that fail before the actual belt. The old 'pulleys' used to be made of steel and solid bearings. The modern ones are maily plastic!!!!!
Nick /////

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Nick Bailey ///// plaatste dit op zijn scherm :

Plastic ?! Hmm... now i see why Fiat are a little cheaper then other cars in the same segment...
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Nick, you are right about the cambelt change every 120000 km (75000 mls). The manual says so, but it also says: 120000 km OR 36 months. I think 120000 km is far too long and i don't risk it. I had mine changed about 75000 km ( 46875 mls; car has done 85000 [53125 mls]now with no problems whatsoever), and had the tensioner changed as well. Better safe than sorry! Cheers, E-Cie.
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One of my Fiats is a 20V Coupe so the cam belt change is an expensive job :-)
Was quite poor after that little episode.
Nick /////
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I feel very sorry for you! ;-) You should drive a Punto instead; very cheap car to run. :-)) Though, i must admit, a Coupe Fiat is a gorgeous car...expensive, but gorgeous! By the way, you wrote Fiats....? E-Cie.
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I do drive a Punto!!!!!
Meet the Fleet
Strada Abarth 130TC Fiat Coupe 20V Punto HGT (1.8 twin cam petrol!) Stilo Abarth
Please don't ask me to say which is my favourite. They ALL are. Horses for Courses as they say. None of these babys are slouches!
And if you ask me nicely I'll tell you what an UNO SX with 46BHP at the wheels can really do! Yes my modest Uno SX, lowered, stiffened, suitably shod holds a few recods to herself................sadly Mistii gave way to Martini the 20V Coupe but the skills of performance, sprint and race circuit driving learned live on.
When was the last time heard a number of experienced drivers of 200+ bhp cars say they could not believe how my Uno went through the bends and that they could not toucher her in the bends!. Mind you I really had to peddle on the straights :-)
Nick /////
Nick /////

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job
Great! Right choice. Have you seen Top Gear's best 100 sporty cars? There was a Strada 130 TC Abarth (Ritmo over here) in it. Clarckson chose the Golf GTI :-( because he thought the Strada wouldn't start anyway...How rude! As C-3PO would have said. How is yours keeping up? Please, tell me what what an UNO SX with 46BHP at the wheels can really do! Nicely enough? :-) Cheers, E.Cie.
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Op 20-12-2004, heeft E-Cie verondersteld :

Hmm fun reading this, go on :-)
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Hey Frank, got something nice to add? :-)
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E-Cie formuleerde op maandag :

Well, my father used to drive Fiat for years when he was younger (600, 128, 124), and then Ritmo and Uno my parents used to have. The last cars they had were several other brands, but i have a feeling the their next car might be a Fiat Stilo :-) And, since i am a member of the Puntoclub in Holland, i am really jealous.... those GT turbo's, wow.... and even better with some tuning, they are very fast. My next car daily car (i also have a VW Golf cabriolet) will certainly be Italian again, however, Alfa is nice too... But time will tell, for now i have other things to spend my money on, i am sure my Punto will last long enough ;-)
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Right, i know the "feeling". When i was a little boy, unspoiled, obedient etc. my father drove a white Fiat 128 2-door (early seventies). In comparison with the cars the father's of my friends drove it was like a "racing-car". It was great fun to drive, instead of all the Fords, Opels and so on in my humble (and my father's) opinion. And it was car of the year, remember? Many Fiats followed (several 128's, a 127, a 131, Uno and a couple of 238's (van), which he rebuild to campers.). That's where my love for Italian cars came from. And, of course, an exellent Fiat-dealer in the town where i live. This dealer has a passion for Italian cars and Fiat in particular and owns several old Fiats like a 1100, 500, 2300 Break and a Dino. So, i'm hooked for life, i'm afraid. And yes, those GT's......:-) and eh, isn't Alfa Italian? ;-) And what's that with the "don't mention the war" -car? Just kiddin'. Greetings, E-Cie.
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Italian cars, good ones and bad ones are driven by passion and desire. Even the humble Fiat 500 or Panda just oooze passion and desire. Add styling, performance (class relative) etc. and you have cars that you can just desire and live with forever. Personally I can't say that of a Ford or Volvo or VW or Merc or Vauxhaul etc. No disrespect to these cars or their customers but I have top range Fiats, have exerienced or owned many models and yet I would love to have and drive a 500 for example. (I entered with a 600D). I'm not unique here. However I don't believe that the same could be said of say a Vauxhaul Senator CD driver (or what ever their latest top range car is) and them wanting to own a Nova 1.0. Same goes for many of the other makes.
Italian cars are a love affair, full of the ups and downs, but always true to their 'form'. Top end, low end, exotics alike.
Nick /////
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Well here goes!
Personally I think that ALL would be sports, racing ..... drivers should start to learn their trade in an under powered, unstable, top heavy, understeering, poor braking, ...... vehicle.
No excuses, you have to learn to live and perform with limited and RELIABLE machinery! That is where my Uno came in. Reliability allowed me to do 6500 miles on circuit, foot to the floor (binary throttle :-) ) driving over a 9+ year period. Wet, dry, light, or dusk you learn to master your trade realtime!. I learned to out outperform the gearbox syncro, double de-clutch (try select a gear in an Uno at 5000+ rpm on the way down), heel and toe and know WHEN TO YIELD! Above all I learn respect. Repsect for my machinery and respect for my fellow track mates.
For the boy racers amongst you YOU WILL BE BEATEN by a Citroen 2CV! Fact! That 2CV that beats you will be driven by a master at their art. They don't measure top spead or BHP. They deliver over multiple miles, laps .... and can up their game by stepping up into a car the same as yours and leave you for dead!
Seriously though, results in any sport is down to dedication, to some extent talent and reliability (as measured by one's ability to show and perform event after event)!
I personaly have found that Fiats for sure, and also Lancia and Alfa Romeos are basically bullet proof and deliver the goods lap after lap, mile after mile. Don't take my word for it. Go ask the Lancia Motor Club GB and AROC (Alfa Romeo Owner's Club), oh and don't forget the Fiats.
What did my modest Uno achieve. 6500+ circuit miles with zero mechanical failures, bar two colapsing exhuast systems, at the rear box, which nearly took the rear brake pipe on each occasion.!
Typical lap average speeds of 80 to 85 mph, top about 102 mph. And I bet you didn't think and Uno SX could reach 80mph :-)
To help my Uno achieve these figures I left the engine standard, re-jetted the carb, and changed the air filter. This gave the 46 BHP at the wheels. I also lowered and stiffened the supspesion system (mainly SACHS components) and indreased the tyre size to 185/60R13. Also played with 185/55R13 tyres. Note! 185s are the largest size tyres the Uno can take without going into offset rims with lower profiles which then upsets the rolling radious. 185/55 or 50 is a favourite for many racers as the slight gain in acceleration does not compromise the top speed or road speedometer readings too much.
At the end of the day taking one's road car (including you) from public roads to race circuits, hill climbs etc., requires one to be realistic, modest and begin as a novice. Look and learn. Listen and watch. When the rain comes and you see fellow drivers taking air out of their tyres go and ask them why. You might think you know why but go and ask anyway. When you see a front wheel car driver increasing the rear tyre pressure go and ask why. (Hint - increasing rear pressures can help to dial out front end understeer). There is so much to learn and continue to learn. Why do you think Michael Schumacher and other F1 drivers work so hard and do so much testing. It is said that Michael is the most demanding, learning and feedback driver of all times. Sure he makes mistakes, sure he has a good car but one has to wonder how the car got that good and how he manages to stay on top of the game. Love him or hate him (I'm sure many of you do and you are entitled to) but at the end of the day forget Michael, forget Ferarri or Fiat. Think you, think your car, think.
The next time you drive along with your elbow resting on the arm rest or window ledge, driving with one hand, feeling cool cruising then WAKE UP. Do that at over 60mph in the outside lane of the motorway and experiance and front wheel blow out and you won't look or feel so cool any more. With luck you will get away with it.
Driving is an art to be perfected at all levels from beginner to F1. Hand in hand with this is car knowledge, sympathy and the willingness to learn and keep learning.
Summary. There was nothing particularly special about my Uno. I'm told I have a driving talent. I maintain that any judged exposition of talent is actually a marriage between man/woman and machine that we can all achieve. SureWhite Van man can burn you off, hound your tailgate, defy death etc. but he/she can't drive! You can build your skills and marriage to your vehicle to the extent that you become 'one' so that you both know each others limitations. Yes I know it sounds odd but I can tell you that when you are on the limit pushing the envelope a little wider that you would have wished, your car will give you that 'little feeling/feedback' that you know through learned experience says 'enough'. It won't come as a surpise because you will have got there over many years and you will have learned to respect what the vehicle is telling you.
Nick /////
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Wow Nick, what a story! I only asked a simple question in my opinion but the answer was quite thorough. Thanks! I have read your story well and i can see why your answer has to be like this. I can agree with you for a great deal, although i do not have any race-experience myself, but that isn't really the issue here. A few years ago i took part in a socalled "race-experience" at the circuit of Zandvoort in the Netherlands. It was a day all about how to drive a racing-line on track; find the limits of a race-car; how to drive a slalom track; how to anticipate; karting; driving a socalled "skid-car" and so on. On that day i learned at lot about how to "really" drive a car. Driving fast is not so difficult; anybody can. But driving fast and save, now that's something different. Indeed, it takes years and a lot of experience to get there. And, after all these years driving my car on the road, i still learn every single day....:-) Greetings, E-Cie.
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Greetings to you E-Cie as well.
There are so many talented sensible drivers out there driving all sorts of machinery from modest little cars to big, fast and expensive cars.
I remember taking a little bit of criticism when I once said "if you are not prepared to be overtaken by a woman driving a Citroen 2CV then don't go out on the circuit". I was only trying to make a statement to put an egotistic male driver in his place before he trashed his car and wrecked go circuit time whilst being recovered from the 'kitty litter' or worse still from the Armco barriers or off his roof.
Sadly the males seem to trash more cars than the females in my experience. The blokes response is "they weren't trying" to which I have only one repsonse. PRATT!
So many people seem to not to be able to grasp the object of the exercise. To get from A to B, alive and well, damage free, having totally enjoyed and learnt from their experience. Road or Race Track the object is the same.
A top/police driver or instructor will judge the ability to "make good progress". This is so much more than keeping up with the flow of the traffic. This is reading ahead, being ahead of the game, spotting the hazards, NOT breaking the speed limits etc.
Now for the fun bit!
At this time of year our Fiats have illuminated Christmas Trees in them. Possibly technically illegal but certainly consider bad taste by many, but what the heck, it is Christmas!
Merry Christmas to all Italian Machinery Drivers! You only have to try and list them to realise how extensive and much loved this kit is.
Fiat Alfa Romeo Lancia, Ferarri, Maserati, ....
Ducati, Moto Guzzi, Cagiva, Aprilia, Piagio.....
Don't you just love the herritage
cio /////
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