convertible in winter?

Hi
I'm thinking of getting a 2002 z28 (or ss) convertible. There are several low mileage cars on autotrader at a decent price. I can really only afford one vehicle, so if I get a convertible it would be
my winter car also. Does anyone here drive one in the winter? I live in Indiana, so winters aren't exteme, but we do get snow, and usually some ice storms. I don't have a garage, would the top last being outside year around? I drove a camaro for 10 years here, so I know that winter driving can be hairy at times, but I've never owned a ragtop before, so I don't know what to expect.
Also, I read that the 2002 convertibles had less body flex than past years because they were designed to be convertibles, anyone know if that is true?
thanks -
Russ
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Just invest in a nice car cover.........

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wrote:

Agree. I bought my '97 Formula convertible new and it has been parked outside with now cover since I brought it home. Our winters in the DC are not too much different than yours. Some snow, occasionally heavy, freezing rain and sleet, but. When it snow, I try to not let more than 3 or 4 inches accummulate on the top. My top is black and I have recently noticed it is starting to fade.
I don't usually drive mine in the snow and ice. I have an old pick-up truck that I drive when the weather turns nasty. My couple of experiences driving the 'Bird in the snow and ice were very "exciting". There is another post in this thread that makes some very good points about that. Basically remember that you have a lot of power being transmitted through a big footprint. Big footprint means fewer pounds per square inch of pressure on the roadway so it is real easy to break traction on asnowy/icy road.
Also, according to f-body.org, our models of f-body convertibles come from the factory with sub-frame connectors to reduce body flex.
Tom e-mail me @ tscalfjr AT cox DOT net

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In the winter you will want snow tires on the car. Else wise the rear end will try to kick out. You will also want to keep weight in the trunk. 200 to 300 pounds. A old lifting weight set would work, in two gym bags, secured in place.
When driving a RWD convertible in low traction situations, accelerate slowly. If you feel the rear end start to float or kick, do not hit the brake peddle, instead lift off the throttle. Also do not try to drive the speed limit in low traction situations.
If you drive properly with with weight in the rear and good snow tires, you should be alright. Charles
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