Help: 1985 Trans am trunk lock question

I need a trunk lock for my 1985 Trans Am (w/o power hatch). Can I use the trunk lock from a 82-92 Camaro? How about the lock from a 82-92 Firebird with a power hatch?
Thanks
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Basically Yes, & Yes. You can also take your old lock out, go to any competent lock smith and get a new lock on the same key.
You should be able to get a new one at the dealers parts counter as well. Where they will code the lock to your keys. Coding means use the correct combination of pins so your current keys operate it.
Some GM lock cylinders interchange from 1996 back all the way to 1966
Charles
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Any parts store should have this lock as well as a locksmith who as Charles mentioned can code it back to the original key so that the intregity of the factory keys/lock system/setup remains unchanged.
Most aftermarket locks now lack the milling at the end of the cylinder so that any blank can by used (previously this was not the case) and recoded. Joe--ASE Certified Parts Specialist & 10th Ann.Club Tech Director '80 Carousel Red Turbo T/A, 27k orig. '79 "Y89" 400/4 speed 10th Ann. T/A, 57k orig '84 Olds 88 Royale Bgm 2 dr, 307 "Rocket" (lol), 143k and still going.... '91 S10 Blazer 4.3Z
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I have had lock smiths tell me they can not recode a GM lock cylinder. I want to do that on 5 or 6 of my cars & trucks. One ignition key, one door/trunk/glovebox/hatch key.
They always tell me it can't be done for one reason or another. Charles
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Charles:
This is an easy one. I just did it on the 1991 Blazer you hear me talk about.
The ignition lock is a no brainer, because most (after a certain year, unless it's a police car with the factory one key system) is independent. Whatever blank it is, it is. Now on old GM, the ignition and doors were the same. You can buy kits from Lockworks (Borg Warner) for most muscle cars with keyed alike doors and ignition locks.
The trick is to figure out what the "odd man out" is. Whichever cylinder can't be recoded, all of the others should match it.
In my case, I forget which it was, but my locksmith friend got them all to be the same key. So, the truck is back like it should be.
Now on the '79 Trans Am I have, the original A code lock was changed to a C (that would be a universal replacement from GM or a 1980 lock, GM rotates the key codes every 4 years (A/B, C/D, E/H, J/K). I wasn't sure if this was a fluke or my car did have the lock changed.
Easy (for my friend). I gave him the key codes from the PHS documents I had gotten and he made up a key based on that. Sure enough, it doesn't fit the C code lock in my vehicle. The lock was changed.
I then found an NOS 1979 vintage A cut lock for it and installed that. True, the original key coded 1979 lock is gone and can't be (from what I know) recoded, so I've got the next best thing. The rest of the car is original.
If I didn't tell you that latter part, you wouldn't know unless you are a locksmith :).
The reason GM locks can't (usually) be recoded is because they have a milling in them that prevents other lettered blanks from being inserted to them. So, if the lock you're working on was an A code, only an A will fit. Buy a lock from the parts store and you'll see that any lettered blank will fit. The aftermarket stuff lacks that milling.
BTW: GM locks are supplied by Strattec (of previous Briggs and Stratton small engine fame).
Hope that sheds some light on it for you. Let me know. Joe--ASE Certified Parts Specialist & 10th Ann.Club Tech Director '80 Carousel Red Turbo T/A, 27k orig. '79 "Y89" 400/4 speed 10th Ann. T/A, 57k orig '84 Olds 88 Royale Bgm 2 dr, 307 "Rocket" (lol), 143k and still going.... '91 S10 Blazer 4.3Z
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You shed more light on it then the lock smith I deal with.. He's a pretty decent fellow, maybe not the brightest. Specializes in household & business locks. I used to do towing for them, and for some reason go back. He has only ever mis-cut 2 keys for me, both times he recut them, just trimming here and there and they worked.
I have thought about trying to find NOS cylinders. I would need 10 door cylinders, 5 ignition, 1 trunk, 1 hatch, 4 glove box (3rd gen has it in the hatch area).
I know if I use a A, B, J, or K blank I can go one key by having all cylinders types coded the same. I have a collection of keys, sorted by blank types from the old junk yard. Maybe 300 different keys. I have started a few cars with door keys before, as well as opened doors with ignition keys before on cars where they have a 2 key system.
Charles
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Just buy some aftermarket locks and have them recoded to those respective keys.
If you buy a door lock aftermarket for whatever application, any of the oval headed keys (for like '74 and up GM) should fit. Have your locksmith body recode the aftermarket lock to whatever key you want. Do the same for all of the other locks in the vehicle.
I just got a trunk lock for my '82 Toronado (used a K blank) and sent the new aftermarket lock along with the '82 issue key to my friend and I got the lock back, all done. Now the car has all the original locks in it as was in '81 when it was built.
What can be done, if you have the original key codes (say for a Pontiac, you get the PHS data, or for a Chevy, get the Protect-o-Plate data), you can have the locksmith recreate that original 19XX (whatever year) coding you want. In this case, the locks and keys will be original as when the car was made. It's a nice touch, but no one really knows it or appreciates it.
Here in NYC, if you see a GM with multiple keys or key codes out of order, you know it was broken into at some point.
As a note bearing, there are some late 70's GMs that won't follow the rules for the locks. They may have used a 1979 lock in a 1978 vehicle.
Most GM ignition locks from 1978 down don't have a retaining screw to hold them in--that makes them different from 1979 (possibly late '78) and up.
What you're trying to do is quite easy with a good locksmith at the helm and putting your thinking cap on.
Good luck. Joe--ASE Certified Parts Specialist & 10th Ann.Club Tech Director '80 Carousel Red Turbo T/A, 27k orig. '79 "Y89" 400/4 speed 10th Ann. T/A, 57k orig '84 Olds 88 Royale Bgm 2 dr, 307 "Rocket" (lol), 143k and still going.... '91 S10 Blazer 4.3Z
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