Tube Connector broke

Under my thermostat is a small opening where a threaded connector (like this one:
http://www.cedarberg.com/snap/sl3pc.gif ) is connected. I was recently
in a collision with a curb, and the screw broke off with the threads still in the hole. I went to Autozone, Advanced Auto Parts, Napa Auto Parts, Home Depot, Lowes, Ajax, and Sears, and no one had an easy-out that would even work on a piece this big, let alone work on a hollow screw. Any suggestions on how to back out the left over metal so I can put a new part in? Thanks. -Ben
--
Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin
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Thanks.
A couple ideas off the top of my head.
A sharp chisel and a hammer.. you might be able to back it out.. If not that, you could drill it out.
-Bruce
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Thanks.
You aren't going to like this. ;^)
I had a similar problem with an aluminum intake. After trying a lot of methods that all failed, I used a sawsall. The blade was too tall to fit so I ground down the top of the blade to half of it's original height. Then I made 4 cuts at 90 degrees that just barely got into the threads of the water port (take your time here). With the cuts finished, I used a small chisel and hammer to peel each section inward and pulled them out. The threads were still in good shape so I vacuumed out as much of the metal dust as possible and used telfon tape on the new fitting. It hasn't leaked in almost 3 years.
YMMV
Dave
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Hate to disagree with the others, but there are a couple of pretty simple ways to do it. One would be if you can find a reverse-thread tap and bolt of the right size... The other, simpler method would be to tap threads and put a bolt in there with some JB weld on it. Leave it overnight and there you go.
The Vampire, "Muffin Man"
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Do not taunt Happy Fun Car.

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The Vampire Muffin Man wrote:

Well, the reverse-thread (easyouts) that I looked at at Lowes and Sears were too small. Where would I find one big enough? And then the tapping, shouldn't I remove the leftover metal before I retap? And if I removed the metal, wouldn't I not need to retap? -Ben
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Really wouldn't need to tap the fitting all the way through, so no metal should wind up where it shouldn't be, unless the fitting is vertical. A little heavy grease should keep metal shavings on the tap instead of letting them fall in, in any case. A little brake cleaner before threading the bolt with the JB weld on it, of course. Shouldn't be any need to re-tap the part that the fitting goes into after you remove the end of the old fitting..
The Vampire, "Muffin Man"
--
Do not taunt Happy Fun Car.

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If this is soft pot metal (aluminum colored) and not brass, an easy-out is not going to work. GM also uses thread locker on those fittings. As someone else mentioned, the saw blade trick works pretty well. Cut it four ways and use a chisel. Since I have the correct size tap, I like to use a carbide bit on a air die grinder to grind it out. Takes only a couple minutes.

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