'04 Crown Victoria towing question!

Hey All,
I normally do not post here, but I needed to know a straight answer and every dealer I talk to tells me something different. I have an '04 Crown Victoria totally stock. I had a hidden hitch class 3
receiver installed and want to pull a 17 ft boat on a single axle trailer. It weighs about 3200 lbs. I want to pull it roughly 2000 miles and then 4 months later, pull it back home. Can this be done without destroying the car? If so, is towing in OD okay?
TIA,
Derek
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
derek wrote:

because otherwise the tail might wag the dog. If I was you, I certainly would put a good sized transmission cooler on it and keep it out of 4th gear most of the time. With a tailwind on level roads, you probably can use OD. You might have to go with medium grade fuel, especially if it's hot out or you're pulling through mountainous territory to prevent any detonation. Keep the speed down and leave lots of room in front of you. The Ford should be able to do it with these caveats. Stan K.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
derek wrote:

Unfortunately, while the chassis is capable of 5000 lbs, the Crown Vic is only rated to 2000 lbs. since 1995, even with the 41G package that includes the rear load-leveling, heavy-duty F/R suspension, dual exhaust, F/R HD sway bars and 3.55 axle.
That said, with a good transmission cooler, and maybe some Car-Go coil springs in the rear, you should not have a problem. Refer to the owner's manual for towing instructions - you will want to use direct-drive 3rd gear for all but the most flat terrain. O/D also provides very little engine braking, by design, on the AODE transmission. If you find that the tranny is hunting between 3rd & 4th while towing, it would be best to switch off the O/D.
Rob
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote in message

Yes Derek you can. Make sure that you put extra air pressure in your tires. Do not put the car in Overdrive. Drive under the speed limit.
My suggestion to you is to modify the car. All you need is an oversized transmission fluid cooler. When the fluid heats up from towing is when you cause damage. Other than that you should be OK. Shop around, somebody might be willing to install one for cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote in message

Thanks everyone for responding. We are going to put an aftermarket trans cooler on it just for safety and will not use OD at all. I'd rather pay a little more in gas than a lot more in trans work. Is it best to bypass the stock cooler or run in series? This has been discussed forever on the Chevy group and no one seems to have an answer.
Thanks again,
Derek
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19 May 2004 12:30:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote:

It is usually recommended that the aftermarket cooler be installed in the system between the OEM cooler return and the trans. The reason for this is the added cooling capacity and the fact that the oil to water cooler in the radiator is much more efficient at reducing the temp of an overheated trans. This is especially needed at low speeds or backing where air flow thru the add-on cooler is reduced. The add-on cooler is most efficient mounted in front of the radiator and A/C condensor so that the air flow is as cool as possible making it more efficient. There are fans available to mount on the cooler to help it at low vehicle speeds should that be required.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19 May 2004 12:30:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote:

Depends on how large the lines are on your aftermarket cooler. If they are larger diameter, don't run in a series. If they are smaller, return it. If they are the same size - run in a series or not, won't matter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@socal.rr.com (derek) wrote in message

An "ASE" Certified mechanic should know...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

warranty it? I hope not. Everyone loves to bash dealers but let me tell you, if we could write a book about customers that do stuff like this , cause damage and then expect the manufacturer to pay for it. ........I am not saying you will but many many do. I can't tell you the number of 4 wheel drive trucks that come in with mud in the intake (yes, actually in the intake tube sometimes the air filter is so wet it weighs 3 pounds) and a rod knock from the rod being bent horribly after ingesting water....and the customer never drove off road....but they scream for 10 minutes at the desk , upsetting everyone including other customers...then switch there story and say well i drove through a puddle maybe, there must be a defect that allows water and mud in the air intake ( the intake is 3 feet off the ground)..sorry long day at work. Brad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.