1978 Ford Granada/Mercury Monarch brakes

I'm working on the brakes of a recently purchased 1978 Mercury Monarch.
I've never worked on floating caliper disk brakes of this vintage. My experience has been on more recent cars or on the old 2 piston
fixed calipers like those used by 1960's/70's Mercedes, Avantis and Ramblers.
On my Monarch the brakes were badly neglected putting 1/4" scores into the left front rotor. It should be replaced. It looks like the rotor and hub are all one casting with the lug bolts pressed in. Are replacements available as an assembly with lug bolts fitted or will some machine shop work with a press be required? None of my local parts houses have the rotor in stock - it has to be special ordered and I'd like to know what to expect.
Also, I'm not sure if the sliding surfaces of the floating caliper should be lubricated. The two sections seem to just grind across each other versus the modern floating calipers that glide on lubricated pins. Is some lubrication used with this old style?
There also seems to be a flat wear bushing set into place on the side of the caliper with a hex head screw. The plate can be slid back and forth, then it's locked into place with the hex head screw. What's this about?
tnx,
Doug
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Doug wrote:

Yes. Bearing races too. Get new bearing & seals while you're at it. Learn how to pack a caged roller bearing and how to press the seals in.

Not necessary, but some anti-seize compound would be fine.

Get a manual. There should be a bar spring in with that "flat wear bushing" as you call it. The retainer & spring slide in & lock the caliper to the knuckle, the screw keeps it all there.
Rob

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Try www.rockauto.com for parts. I bought rotors for a 72 Torino disc brake spindles that I put on my 66 Ford Galaxie.

The caliper should float freely on the spindle, not grind.

The end of the caliper opposite of the wear bushing you describe has a sholder machined into it. This sholder rests on another sholder on the spindle. The wear bushing you describe holds the caliper onto the spindle. The hex bolt keeps the wear bushing from coming off the spindle but permits the caliper to slide on the spindle when the brakes are applied. The caliper has to move to accomodate brake pad wear.
Goodle search the front brakes for a schematic, all will fall in place.

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On Tue, 21 Aug 2007 21:45:35 -0400, "Frank from Deeetroit"

I'll try to find a schematic.
The caliper doesn't seem to move against the spindle. One cast half slides against the other cast half.
However, that wear bushing has nothing to do with holding the caliper on the spindle. Two bolts on one cast half of the caliper go directly thru the spindle.
Doug
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I have a 1978 Ford Granada and I replaced the front rotors in 1990. It is a simple job.
Use a hex key to remove the round headed bolt. Use an old screwdriver to tap the block and spring free from the caliper.
Life the upper caliper off and place in on the control arm.

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