1984 Ford LTD starter/solenoid problem

Hello... Hope someone has some advice and if this isn't the correct news group for this, please direct me.
Replaced the starter on the LTD...worked fine for a couple of days. Upon
trying to start it after those couple of days, I noticed the negative battery wire and solenoid would get VERY hot and the engine wouldn't crank over. Took the starter back.... they tested it and said it was bad. Replaced the starter again... started okay the first couple of times....then right back to not cranking... it would sound like it wanted to crank over, but just wouldn't. Replaced the solenoid (even though it tested good, they're cheap so I figured what the heck). Still the same problem... sounds like it wants to crank, but won't and the negative battery cable and solenoid get very hot when I try to crank it over. Any ideas before I have this thing towed into a shop for testing?
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To cause a cable to heat means its either carrying too much current or it has become resistive and normal current will cause it to heat and impede the current. I haven't seen a cable go resistive so I'm inclined to wonder about the lugs and whether they are making good contact with the cable.
If the engine is providing too much resistance to turning the stall condition will cause massive current for much longer than the cables/solenoid are designed to take. Is the pinion teeth number correct? Is the engine ignition timing not too far advanced? These will cause stalling.
If the battery is sagged it will supply sufficient current for the starter to try and turn and cause what current the battery can provide to heat the cables.
If its a V8 it needs evrything in good condition to effect reliable starting: good contacts and a good battery.
Jason
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If your LTD has the 3.8L V6 engine, the starter installation is difficult, it's hard to see what you are doing, and fairly easy to put it in crooked. Happened to me after replacing an engine when one end of the mounting flange got caught on something - could have been the torque converter access cover - it doesn't take much. In my case the pinion gear on the starter was destroyed and not engaging anymore, but I guess that it could jam too. That would explain the heavy current consumption.

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Found the problem..... was a bad wire going from the starter to the solenoid. About half way the length of the wire, it was corroded pretty bad. Thanks for your suggestion and the others that replied as well :)
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