1990 Ford Escort GT - AC Liquid Line and Expansion Valve

Replacing the AC lines, accumulator and compressor on my old car. I obtained an original unused motorcraft AC liquid line from eBay and I thought I read somewhere that the AC expansion valve came integral with
this part. Anyone know how to verify?
The old liquid line has a metal section where it connected to the AC coil, is that were the old expansion is located? I haven't gotten to comparing the old & new yet, but wanted to ask.
Thanks sleepdog
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Still confused...
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

There are three lines, pressure to condenser, the condenser to evap, which usually includes the orifice tube, and the accum to compressor.
The orifice will always be in a steel section
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So even if I can't actually see it, if it's a motorcraft liquid line, I can assume that's where they put the orifice/expansion valve?
Just found out I got the wrong liquid line, this one has a flare fitting on the end, even though the numbers matched when I looked them up. Mine uses all spring lock couplings. No big, just need to order the right one.
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