1993 ford taurus

i recently did the emissions test here in ontario and my car got a fail grade due to high NOx leves. Ive already changed the EGR valve for a new one already. i was wondering if anyone else had some good
tips for fixing an NOx emissions problem with these cars? or if anyones had experience with this problem and knows which sensors might need chaning/any other probable causes to this problem. as the subject says its a 93 ford Taurus 6 cylinder, 3.0L GL. any tips would be appreciated =)
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try the oxygen sensor. should be in the exhaust pipe somewhere.
"janka" wrote:
> i recently did the emissions test here in ontario and my car > got a fail grade due to high NOx leves. I've already changed > the EGR valve for a new one already. i was wondering if anyone > else had some good tips for fixing an NOx emissions problem > with these cars? or if anyone's had experience with this > problem and knows which sensors might need chaning/any other > probable causes to this problem. as the subject says its a '93 > ford Taurus 6 cylinder, 3.0L GL. any tips would be appreciated > =)
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"janka" wrote: (1993 Ford Taurus 6 cyl 3.0L GL.)
Here in Ontario my car failed its emissions test due to a high NOx level. Ive changed the EGR valve. Does anyone have some tips for fixing a NOx problem? Which sensors might need changing/any other probable causes? ________________________________________________
Hi NOx indicates air/fuel mixture too lean. The EGR valve richens the mixture, so the new valve may solve the problem. The most likely other source of excess air is a vacuum leak. Sometimes a defective oxygen sensor will fail to trigger the EGR valve.
Good luck.
Rodan.
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"Rodan" wrote:

Thank God you don't work on cars for a living. Perhaps you could explain how Recirculating a portion of the now-inert Exhaust Gasses could possibly richen the mixture?
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I had high NOx (albeit on a 94 Mazda Protoge). Catalytic converter solved it.
DW
janka wrote:

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wrote:

Only one thing causes NOX - high temps in the combustion chamber. Several things can contribute to this. High operating temps or lack of EGR are the most common. Extreme lean mixture can contribute to high operating temps. So can a bad rad, bad water pump, bad fan. etc. Almost all engines will produce SOME NOX under normal conditions - some more than others - so a reducing bed catalyst is used to clean up the exhaust. If the reducing bed is dead, high NOX can result. The catalyst CAN still be working for CO/hc reduction (which is an oxidizing catalyst)and yet fail NOX.
If you have high NOX, verify the EGR is working, verify operting temperatures, check for oxygen leaks, and replace the converter if necessary.
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