1999 Ford Taurus blower motor question.

Hi all We have/had (it's coming back nt. week) a 99 Taurus in the shop,with no speeds at all on the blower motor. Customer tested the blower motor,by " hot wiring" it,and so did I.
Him and hid dad tested the resistor with an Ohm meter and said it "seemed" to be OK. I was checking it out, but I had my way of thinking wrong,as I was looking for power to come OUT of the switch, and TO the resistor. I found no power TO the resistor,and checked all the fuses under the hood, and all were good. Doing a Google search,I am finding My way of thing was wrong, But that with the A/C or heater select switch on,I should have power to one side of the blower motor ,and then the power goes through the resistor to the speed switch through the ground. (0r something like that....LOL)
Well I an not getting power to the blower motor,but I did hot wire the one side of the blower motor, and then I have all my speeds,So I think I can safely assume my motor,resistor,and switch are OK. I don't have a wiring diagram,so I don't know what to check next. I wanted to check for power to the A/C or heater select switch ,but I cant get the radio panel off,I did put the "release tools"(made out of coat hanger wires) in the 4 holes, but it would not come out, and I did not want to break anything. Any other Ideas where to check for my power to my blower motor? Thanks, Tony
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Why do you work for this company?
Find a job with a real company. <...>
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Look, If you cant Help Fuck Off

his
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Anthony... for nearly 40 years I have been in this trade.... Currently I am the shop foreman for a growing dealership... 7 bays at present with 7 more on the way...
Now, I do want to apologize for "going off" like that.... but, man.... I can't find words for what it makes me think and feel....
I realize that you must be young and new to this trade so allow me to offer some advice....
First and foremost.... the modern automobile is built around electronics. A tech needs a sound basic knowledge of electricity, it's principles, proper testing, selecting the proper test and deciphering test results. Get a good quality DMM and learn how to use it properly.... Three voltage drop tests are all that is required to almost isolate the concern.... know when to set the DMM aside and use an incandescent test lamp or a powered, low impedance test lamp or even a sealed beam headlight with test leads attached - each and every one of these tools has a use - depending on what we are doing will have us select the appropriate "weapon". Without a solid knowledge of electrical, a tech will be doomed to guessing, wasting time and will be denied the "cat bird seat". In Canada, we have an apprenticeship porogram that takes care of things like this... in the US, you will likely have to attend a college or trades school but this knowledge is vital if you desire to be a good tech.
Second... documentation.... Without the manuals, everything is going to be a guess.... very possibly an expensive guess.... If I feel that I am unfamiliar with an electrical circuit, I look at the wiring diagram first... Thursday, one of my junior techs came to me.... he had over two hours into an ABS light.... I had him show me where he was in the pinpoint test.... a glance at the circuit diagram and I had him look at all the connectors in that circuit with the advice of which connector I would look at first... the growing green death told the story. It was a retail job so we tried cleaning and protecting the connections rather than replacing harnesses... One happy customer. Knowing how the circuit works is a prerequisite for repairing it in a timely and efficient manner.
Sticking with 'documentation' for a bit.... todays engines and such are pretty "high strung" compared to their older brothers.... Proper assembly techniques and close attention to torquing fasteners is more important than ever... and is only going to become more important in the future. Workshop manuals will guide us through these techniques and show us when and where we will require special tools.....
And that brings us to tools.... A good DMM, specialty tools as required by our "customer base", a good and capable scan tool and the time to "play" with it in order to understand it's capabilities (as well as our own). We should regard our manuals as "tools", as well... Without them we might as well be without a hammer or a ratchet...
Fourth (tools was third, OK?)... knowledge.... we should endeavour to gain knowledge from any source we can. Aftermarket manufacturers often have FAQs on their websites... auto parts stores often have some sort of teaching aids on their websites NAPA, I am sure, is one.... KEM used to have some stuff on their weebsite... others are likely similar. SnapOn and MAC offer courses... yes, they are usually thinly disguised sales seminars - but there is knowledge to be gained... and knowledge is truly power... Knowledge.... build a simple circuit with a lamp a switch and a battery... practice with your DMM on this circuit... add a resistor to some point in the circuit to learn what happens when a wire or terminal corodes... put the swtich in the hot side to see how it works (DMM-wise) put the switch in the ground side (few automotive circuits are power side switched on late models) and see how that looks on the DMM. Good shop manuals include a subsection in each section called "Description and operation".... put down the Spiderman comic - lay Dean Koontz and Tom Clancy to the sode... read "descrition and operation" until your eyes hurt. Join i-ATN... read the forums.. check out the areas of the site that you are allowed to view... BATauto has some decent stuff. Look around... there's some good stuff - by no means is it everything you will need but it will be a decent start.
Now, this part could be "lastly" but there is a lot of things I haven't mentioned... so we'll call it "next".... your employer... and yours is one that needs a special sumthin' from the sound of it..... A good boss will desire his techs to learn and improve... he will endeavour to find the training that his techs need... he will give them the manuals they need and have specialty tools available.... If he doesn't do this, you will remain stuck in a dead end job.... you will never have the chance to be as good as you can be.... and you wont advance in your chosen field. The rewards are there to be had for a tech that is good at what he does and makes customers happy.... I have two diesel certified techs that will make an obscene amount of money this year because they are good at what they do and I am there to ensure that our customers are happy.... and not a BG flush to be had... I wont put up with that kind of crap...
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Thanks Jim, Sounds like a hell of a nice shop.
Yes, I am in a dead end job, and it will not change. The garage is owned by a corporation, Who has no desire to spend any money on training,or equipment.
(They are even talking about closing it down and making a bigger C- store out of the Bay area.)
And it is run by my manager, who has no desire to change anything either. He is content where he "is at" I am not. I need to try to get myself into a dealership.
Thanks for your encouragement Tony
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Anthony... check out the Ford ASSET program.... (I think they call it that in the US). Most of the manufacturers have something similar...
Yep... Google is our friend... http://www.fordasset.com/asset.html
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Groups: alt.autos.ford That should be helpful
Its pretty simple really. 12 volts from the fuse box goes to the heater A/C selector switch. If either is on, it send the 12 volts to one side of the blower motor. From the other side of the blower motor, it goes to the resistor pack and speed switch, and then to ground. You need a volt meter or test light to trace it out. With the climate control switch on, you should be reading voltage at the motor. If not, there is no power to the switch (probably a fuse) or the switch is bad. If there is power to the motor, either the motor is bad, the resistor pack is bad, or the ground on the resistor pack is bad. If you have power to one side of the motor, you can ground the other side. If the motor runs OK then (full speed), then its the resistor pack, speed switch or ground connection.
The flat side of the motor connector comes from the A/C selector switch. the rounded side goes to the resistor pack and blower speed switch. BOB
So I will have to check for power In to and out of the heater A/C selector switch.
Thanks for the post Bob. Tony
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-snip-
Tony.... you're one of the good guys. Knew the minute I read your OP, that Warman was gonna lite you up... but as you now know, it's not your fault. He's fighting a battle from the middle. One side, stupid know-nothing 'techs' and the guys who run their shops. And the other side, dumbass know-nothing customers who dont realize how complicated any technology is and if someone charges more than 1.98 to fix it claim they been ripped off.
Well, just like with medical problems, I found I better learn enough to do my own diagnosis or at least get the facts.
When you leave your job for one with a future, the situation will get worse for those customers coming to your shop ut there's nothing can be done except let them lose customers..
BTW.. I got BACK into cars, thirty years after stopping playing with them, because they became electronified! And every one of the mechs around my area amazed me with their lack of knowledge on engine controls... and I never could get carbs adjusted right.
--
Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, putting up with my 'smartass' is the price
you pay..DEAL with it!
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Backyard Mechanic wrote:

electronified? Is that a word?
what's a carb? Is it something like a vinyl record? :)
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Thanks Backyard Mechanic

No, But I think it should be.........LOL Tony
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