57 Plymouth to be unearthed from 50 year Time Capsule

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wrote:


In answer to an earlier note that the plumber wouldn't have been able to get a heavy enough "van" back around 1949, I dug up a bit of info. In 1955-59 the 3805 Chevy series was a ONE TON Panel Van. In 1935-1938 the Dodge Four Point was available as a 3/4, 1, and 1 1/2 ton panel van.

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The truck sold today have to meet pollution standards. What if horses had to meet those standards as well? ;)
mike
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2007 11:36:32 -0500, "Mike Hunter"

Diapers.
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2007 11:36:32 -0500, "Mike Hunter"

I believe that one of the driving forces for streetcars in major cities back when horses were the standard power plant was the horse manure. There was an army of street sweepers employed in those cities to shovel the crap. And when it rained.... you didn't want to be there.

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wrote:

My great great great grandfather was a plumber in the early 1800's and he drove a pimped out Conastoga wagon with 40 inch rims. His horse power was provided by a team of Budweiser Clydesdales.
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Putting aside the essentially meaningless

That gadgetry didnt necessarily make things better, did it, Ashton?
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Personally, I wish the days when there weren't windshield washers, power brakes and air conditioning weren't around. Nothing like not being able to see out the window in the bad weather. It is always fun trying to get warm before heaters, too.
I suggest that if you leave in the Northeast, you just go in your car. Don't turn on the windshield washer. Keep the off. And simulate not having power brakes by stopping real slowly. And just for fun , don't turn on the heat. Then tell us if they make things better.
Jeff
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wrote in message

The electronic gadgetry doesnt make much better. Electric windshield wipers were a great step forward from those manifold vacuum driven Ps.O.S. We always had heaters in our cars, even back to the 41 Ford we drove.
Air conditioning came later, but was a godsend. It did not have a $600 computer. It had an on/off position and a thermostat. Not bad, really.
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Odd that windshield washers have been available since at least the early 50's, and that power brakes don't actually let you stop any faster, isn't it?
nate
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The point is not that modern cars are not "better" in that they have more features, the heaters and wipers work better, the transmissions are more efficient, etc,. But that's just refinement. The basic design of the vehicle is the same, the functionality is the same, and in many ways there's not much different even in the "better" part. A 1960 Caddy didn't have great handling perhaps but it was comfortable and had all the creature comforts of any significance unless you think cup holders constitute basic functions of a car.
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Electric wipers that run when you push down the pedal going up a hill are a huge improvement over the vacuum motors. I don't think that is a gadget at all.
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They've also been around for close to 70 years now. I'm not aware of any mainstream vehicles that used vacuum wipers past the mid-50's. I'm guessing that Packard was one of the last; and by the end, most vehicles used an auxiliary vacuum pump off either the fuel pump or the oil pump instead of manifold vacuum. I will grant you that there were some pretty dramatic improvements in vehicles during the first half of the 20th century; the difference between a "brass era" car and a 50's car is incredible.
You could pluck anyone off the street today and put them behind the wheel of a decent 50's car and with a little familiarization they could drive it safely and comfortably in today's traffic. Which was the whole point that several people were trying to make earlier in this thread.
A case could be made that the American automotive industry peaked around 1971 and it would be difficult to argue with that; certainly the period between about 1976 and only a few years ago was witness to some seriously suckful products put out by once-proud manufacturers.
nate
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Video on the 57 Plymouth
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2cPBl6scJk

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N8N wrote:

Ford Falcons of the early '60s had vacuum wipers, and American Motors used them through the late sixties.
The later fifties was a great era for gaudy automobile design. Chrysler took it a step further with their land yachts that had such quirky features as big tail fins, a rear view mirror that stuck up from the dashboard, an odd shaped steering wheel, and push-button transmission controls. The 57 Plymouth gave a preview of the dual headlight look with the parking light next to the headlight. It resembled a face with a black eye.
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Still gotta love the Lincoln Futura. Awesome looking car. Too bad it never went into production.
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It became the Batmobile!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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True.
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Very few test mules ever go into production.
mike

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The best car I ever had was my 69 Firebird 400. It was quieter on the road then my 99GT, driving position and seat was better, interior was nicer looking, and steering was actually quicker and more precise feeling. Handling was worst though. Mileage in normal driving was not great but I got about 15 mpg on a fast trip and once got 21 mpg doing a steady 55 mph from phx to LA during the 72 oil crisis. The 99gt is technically a better car and I really like it but it will never replace the 69 when all categories of "why I like a car" are added up. And the 69 was still on it's original, unturned front disks at 125,000 miles. And they were SHOT.
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Nope. In practical terms, my 1960 corvair did everything my current vehicles do except it didn't have AC. Yeah, it was gutless. But it was pleasant to drive from Phx to LA.
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