88 thunderbird tc

I've got an 88 Ford Thunderbird, 2.3L with turbo, 5 speed transmission. I LOVE this car, except for one tiny annoying problem that is growing worse. If I drive the car for over an hour in warm weather, the
engine dies and refuses to restart for 15 to 30 minutes. After restarting, its good for another 15 to 30 minutes of driving, and then we stall again. This used to only happen when the outside temperature was in the 90's, then last summer it started doing it in the 80's and high 70's. This past week it happened and the temperature was only 64 degrees (I had been driving (highway) for about an hour and a half). The point where this problem almost always occurs is when going from highway speeds to a dead stop. This most recent time obeyed that pattern, I was coming down the exit ramp from the highway to a city street.
I've replaced the plugs, plug wires, ignition coil, and distributor cap and rotor and the ignition module on the distributor. I do know that there is spark present, even when the engine won't start. I have nothing to test the fuel pressure with. I do know that when the engine has stalled and won't start and I first turn the ignition "on", the fuel pump comes on for a few seconds like it always does, and then cuts off when it reaches the correct pressure (I assume). Of course, just because it is coming on and I can hear it does not mean that it is actually pumping anything. Is there a simple way to test for the presence or absence of fuel at the engine?
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Gregory wrote:

TFI module at distributor is the usual problem, or just reac the engine trouble codes for a clue.
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"Gregory" wrote

Usual symptoms of a failing TFI module.

With an OEM Ford module, or crappy Pep-boys clone? Did you remember to use heat sink compound on the module? Some folks (and later Ford models) remote-mount the module away from the distributor heat on the radiator support, with a BIG aluminum heat sink, like this...
http://www.autozone.com/images/cds/jpg/small/0900823d8014d147.jpg

But sparking at the right time?

That's just the ECU "priming" the system. It doesn't know the pressure.

You could try blipping the pin in the test port on the chrome fuel rail. Looks like a tire valve, should be behind the throttle body on the driver's side. Of course, a pressure gauge works better, and spraying gasoline on a hot engine is not particulary safe.
I'm mostly a 5.0 guy, but our TC crowd would probably have more answers, or maybe just more questions. Come by for a visit (and bring some cookies)... http://www.foxtbirdcougarforums.com /
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I've got an 88 Ford Thunderbird, 2.3L with turbo, 5 speed > transmission. > I LOVE this car, except for one tiny annoying problem that is growing > worse. If I drive the car for over an hour in warm weather, the > engine > dies and refuses to restart for 15 to 30 minutes. After restarting, > its > good for another 15 to 30 minutes of driving, and then we stall again. > This used to only happen when the outside temperature was in the 90's, > then last summer it started doing it in the 80's and high 70's. This > past > week it happened and the temperature was only 64 degrees (I had been > driving (highway) for about an hour and a half). The point where this > problem almost always occurs is when going from highway speeds to a > dead > stop. This most recent time obeyed that pattern, I was coming down > the > exit ramp from the highway to a city street. > > I've replaced the plugs, plug wires, ignition coil, and distributor > cap > and rotor and the ignition module on the distributor. I do know that > there is spark present, even when the engine > won't start. I have nothing to test the fuel pressure with. I do > know > that when the engine has stalled and won't start and I first turn the > ignition "on", the fuel pump comes on for a few seconds like it always > does, and then cuts off when it reaches the correct pressure (I > assume). > Of course, just because it is coming on and I can hear it does not > mean > that it is actually pumping anything. Is there a simple way to test > for > the presence or absence of fuel at the engine?
turbo t/birds as a rule did'nt have problems with the tfi module. they did have problems with the integrated control module on the right shock tower. this module contains the eec, fuel pump, cooling fan, and ac relays.
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