93 Ranger stock radio removal...

I'm trying this. It seems stuck.
I made some DIN removal tools, and "set" them to 1 and 1/4 inch depth.
When I put them in, I feel the stereo loosen, but I can't get it to budge
forward.
It seems to wiggle in place. It feels like maybe there is something holding it from the center, like a bolt into the bottom.
Any tips?
Any good sites for junk like this???
TIA!
~e.
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visions of effty wrote:

ends, which sets the depth and allows you to pull the radio out with them. If you go in too deep the spring clips will often push outward and make the radio tight.
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I'm going to stop and do that tonight. Maybe the actual tools will help. I can already get a good grip on the stereo since there is a crack in the face of the radio large enough to stick a finger through and yank on. I stick my tools in, and the thing wiggles, but doesn't come forward. It really feels like there's a bolt in the center bottom of the stereo, but that runs contrary to my experience with the Ford DIN system.
I'm puzzled as to why my tools don't work when they sound and feel like they should. I hope I haven't damaged the retaining clips...
~e.
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Well, I went and got the "OEM removal tools." They worked instantly!
10 bucks though. :-( Argh!
I don't see much difference between these things and my coat hangers except thickness. These things are pretty thick. They got the clips on the stereo very flat whereas my coat hangers got the clips only mostly flat.
So if you try this at home find some really thick-ass wire to begin with, or pay the 10 dollar entrance fee to the land of "Ford OEM removal tools."
~e.
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Yup. You spend the ten bux and keep them somewhere you'll not lose them. I've had my same set for >10 years, and have used them maybe 3 times. It's definitely worth $3.33 each time to not break a radio. :-)
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On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 23:33:01 GMT, "visions of effty"

Fact of life: Good tools often aren't cheap. Cheap tools often aren't good.
Go buy a good toolbox for your good tools, take care of them, and they'll likely last you a lifetime - and for another generation or two into the future.
And have a "Decoy" toolbox with the cheap crap you've collected over the years - these are the ones you loan out to neighbors and kids when you may never see them again. Or for the jobs where they're likely to get damaged or destroyed.
--<< Bruce >>--
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visions of effty wrote:

Well, you've found out that it costs $10 to pull the radio from a 93 ranger ONCE when you "really" need to pull the radio..( $5 twice, $2.50 for 4 times). Many folks would seek out someone who has the tools and does it all the time, it only takes a few seconds, right? They squeal when that guy charges them $5. He already paid $10 or more for the tools and it must be paid for by now, certainly. Basically, I bought the tool and you didn't. You don't want to pay $10 for the tool, so the charge is $10. It takes tools that I have to buy plus my time, so no free ride for those who won't buy the proper tools.
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I have a friend that lives in a pretty ghetto apartment complex. He owns an automotive code reader, you know, a diagnostic computer. Any Saturday or Sunday he can make money with the thing. He looks for people working on their cars, and says if you give me 20 bucks, I'll tell you what the computer thinks is wrong with your car. Cheaper than having a mechanic read error codes for you. I'm sure he's paid for the thing several times over.
I'm sure I'll eventually get a return on my $10!
The new stereo sounds brilliant compared to the old hunk of Ford junk, btw.
~e.
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On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 21:59:43 GMT, "visions of effty"

I have done this with nails, drill bits, and the proper tools. It's a lot easier with the proper tool but it can be done with the others if you work at it. The problem with the UN-proper tools is that they don't have the "groove" that catches and helps you pull it out and the tips aren't pointed so if you go in as far as the proper tool would you wind up pushing the blunt end of the un-proper tool against the spring clip and pushing it back out, if you aren't careful you can bend the spring clips and that makes if very hard to get the radio out even with the proper tool.
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