'94 Boid: Battery

Re: '94 Boid: Battery
Hi,
I belong to '94 Tbird LX V8, 61K miles. 'Tis "El Chicken of Thunders". :-)
Got a Die-Hard Silver in 1999. Wondering if it'll make it
thru the winter. A battery failure in the dead of winter could be a hardship.
Last time I looked ('99), a battery test didn't necessarily mean much. To what extent is it practical to test a 6-yr-old battery?
Local Ford dealers have "Genuine Motorcraft Tested Tough Plus" 84-month 650 CCA for $65, which seems kinda reasonable. Anybody know who makes this battery? Who is "Motorcraft" nowadaze (I've often wondered)?
Best to just replace it or should I get it tested first? I'm strapped for $.
TIA, Puddin'
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Since it's a diehard, you're living on borrowed time anyway.
That's just my bias based on my experiences with the brand, both new and used.
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Yeh, I'm a Krusty old Geezer, staving off dementia here..DEAL with it!

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snipped-for-privacy@Gmail.Com says...
Find an Interstate Battery dealer. See if they will sell you a "blem" A blem means the case may have a minor scrape of ding on it that does not affect the battery operation. $30 for a new blem around my area.
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I never had a Die Hard get far beyond the warranty. You could load test that old battery and it might show good. Then it could let you down the next day. (Same with a new battery, but far less likely.) I prefer a 900-1000CCA battery for extra help on those extra cold days. I think you could get something with more than 650 CCA for the same price. The Ford dealer has to charge more.
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Thanks for various responses.
By way of answering some of my own questions, I humbly present:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Auto Batteries http://shopping.yahoo.com/premium/consumerreports/silver.html?id 700426
All car batteries arent created equal. A batterys size, rated capacity, and its age help determine how it will perform.
The time to think about buying a new auto battery is before the old one fails. Once youre stranded by a dead battery, you probably wont want to spend time shopping around for another. At the first sign that your current battery is growing weaker, have a garage perform a load test to see if its holding a charge properly. If it isnt, find a new battery.
WHAT'S AVAILABLE
Most auto batteries are made by just three manufacturers, Delphi, Exide, and Johnson Controls Industries. Each makes batteries sold under several different brand names.
Delphi makes ACDelco and some EverStart (Wal-Mart) models. Exide makes Champion, Exide, Napa, and some EverStart batteries. Johnson Controls makes Diehard (Sears), Duralast (AutoZone), Interstate, Kirkland (Costco), Motorcraft (Ford), and some EverStarts.
Service centers such as Firestone, Goodyear, Pep Boys, and Sears tend to have a large, fresh inventory and relatively low prices. They also handle installation. Stores such as Kmart, Target, Trak Auto, and Wal-Mart may have the lowest prices, but not all of them can install a battery for you. Installing a battery yourself is not technically difficult but it can be cumbersome and you have to dispose of the old battery properly. Service stations and tune-up shops sell batteries as well, and they offer convenient and comprehensive service, but their selection tends to be limited and their stock may not be fresh. For cars and trucks still under warranty, a franchised dealer is your first choice, particularly if the vehicle warranty covers the battery. For older vehicles, though, a dealership is probably the last resort--its the most expensive service venue. The two most crucial factors in choosing a battery are its group size and cold-cranking amps, or CCA.
Group size. A group size defines the batterys outside dimensions and the placement of the terminals on them. For instance, group size 75 fits mainly General Motors cars. Size 65 applies to most large Ford, Lincoln, and Mercury products. Newer Hondas, Nissans, and Toyotas use size 35. Most Chryslers use 34. Youll also see combinations like 34/78, which has two sets of terminals and will fit either Chryslers or some GM models.
Choose the group size recommended by your cars manufacturer. (Reference guides at places where batteries are sold can tell you which group size your car needs.) The wrong size may not fit securely.
Cold-cranking amps. CCA is a measure of a batterys ability to start a car in cold weather, when thickened engine oil and slowed chemical reactions make starting hardest. CCAs denote how much current the battery can deliver to the starter at 0 F. Dont confuse CCA with CA, which stands for Cranking Amps. Thats a measure taken at 32 instead of 0 and is typically much higher than the CCA rating.
IMPORTANT FEATURES
Reserve capacity is another important measure of battery quality. It indicates how many minutes your car might run using the battery alone, should the cars alternator fail. You may have to check product literature rather than the batterys labeling to find the reserve capacity.
Buy a fresh battery--one manufactured less than six months earlier. Batteries are stamped with a date code, either on the batterys case or an attached label. The vital information is usually in the first two characters--a letter and a digit. Most codes start with the letter indicating the month: A for January, B for February, and so forth. The digit denotes the year--say 0 for 2000. For example, B3 stands for February 2003.
Like CA ratings, battery warranties can sound better than they are. Youll see two numbers: one for the total warranty period and one for the free-replacement period (usually three months to three years). The free-replacement period is key. If the old battery fails after this period expires, you get only a prorated credit toward a new battery.
HOW TO CHOOSE
Check the battery group size and CCA for your vehicle. Not every brand comes in every CCA level. To get the brand you want, you may need to go a bit above your cars CCA requirements.
Steer clear of batteries with a CCA rating below the one specified for your vehicle, as well as those rated 200 amps or more higher than the specified rating. Its a waste of money to go too high. Buy a battery with the longest reserve capacity you can find. If its not printed on the battery (and it usually isnt), ask store personnel or check product literature. Should your cars charging system fail, a longer capacity can make the difference between driving to safety and getting stuck.
For the latest information on this and many other products and services, visit www.ConsumerReports.org. Click here to try ConsumerReports.org FREE for 30 days.
All of the above text is provided by Consumers Union. Yahoo! disclaims any liability for the content provided above. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Right now, a Delphi EverStart ~650 CCA for reasonable $ sounds good ('tho I hate WalMart and to date have (lifetime) spent less than $10 with them).
But http://www.everstartbatteries.com/ is offline, so I cant get any info ...
Cheers, Puddin'
wrote:

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