'94 Probe 2.0 oil leak

cross-posted to alt.autos.ford, alt.cars.Ford-Probe, rec.autos.makers.ford
I have a '94 Probe with the 2.0 liter 4 cylinder engine that has developed
an oil leak. It looked like it was coming from the bottom of the timing cover area at first glance. I figured it was a crankshaft seal going out, so I started removing the components on the front of the engine necessary to access the timing belt and sprockets. I found the lower timing cover had a 1/4 inch wide gash about 3 inches long worn through from the crank pulley rubbing against it. The more I looked at the engine face the more I thought about where the oil was coming from. The entire inside of the timing cover area is soaked with oil from top to bottom. It appears to be more than just the crankshaft seal leaking. Is this supposed to be a dry area of the engine? Oddly, the timing belt doesn't seem to be oil contaminated, but I'm going to replace it anyway. I don't know if there is oil leaking out of the timing cover, or if there is something leaking oil into the timing cover. Is the damaged timing cover the source of my oil leak, or is there something else leaking that's letting oil get in there in the first place?
Ken
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That area should be dry, no fluids, the leak is from a bad crankshaft seal.

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Bryan wrote:

I changed the broken upper and lower timing covers, the crankshaft seal, both camshaft seals, and the valve cover gasket along with the timing tension spring and timing belt for good measure. It still leaks oil. Now I believe it's the oil pump. It's the only thing in that area that hasn't been repaired. Opinions anyone?
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Isn't the oil pump inside the engine at the bottom of the oil pan where the oil pickup is?
You can go to a shop, get them to put a dye in you oil and take a black light to find the leak. The dye turns yellow or green under the light, the easiest way to diagnose.

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