94 taurus vacuum hose problem

94 taurus wagon 3.0 V6. There is a tube coming from the fuel injection stuff that runs to the exhaust manifold. There is a small metal tube coming
from that to a rubber tube and that leads to the DPFE EGR sensor. (part number F2SE-9J460-AA)
I was climbing a steep hill on Saturday when the vacuum hose popped off. Since then, any time I accellerate, the vacuum hose pops off.
I was thinking that the only thing that might cause this is excessive exhaust back pressure. That made me think perhaps a plugged catalytic converter. - Well, this car has two catalytic converters and there seems to be unrestricted exhaust flow at the tailpipe (I have no way to test the pressure, but there seems to be ample flow of exhaust coming from the pipe)
The car seems to have enough power, but the exhaust flowing out of that little metal tube is quite loud. Further, the only problem with the cars performance I've noticed so far is an inability to adjust to normal idle when comi8ng to a stop. It bounces back and forth from 500 to about 1000 RPM two or three times when I come to a stop.
Could there be any other cause than plugged catalytic converters?
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twobirds wrote:

Put a small hose clamp on it.
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twobirds wrote:

The hoses are silicone. Although very durable they sometimes get soft and lose their "grip". There is a slight amount of pressure in them. Try replacing the hose, I would suggest both. Don't use regular rubber tubing, it won't last 10 minutes. The silicone hoses is pricy compared to regular hose and used to be a dealer only item. I'm sure that parts stores carry it by now, but maybe not.
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And replace your IAC valve... mind the mfr and shop around, none of us here seem to think highly of 'Wells" brand. (probably because they screwed the pooch on their TFI ignition modules.)

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Tom Adkins wrote:

IIRC that hose is not only silicon but VERY THICK. I seriously doubt you could get it anywhere but the dealer. I forgot to add, get a clamp made for silicon, it will not have the grooves in it for the screw, it will be smooth all the way around on the inside. OR just use a nylon wire tie, that would probably give you the extra little grip it needs to stay on.
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ShoeSaleman wrote:

I hose clamped it on and the hose exploded. I guesse I have excessive exhaust back pressure. I really don't understand it, though. I've been through plugged catalytic converters before and the vehicle lost power. This car has not done that and is, in fact, running well. The only problem seems to be that this hose won't stay put and when it is disconnected, the car doesn't run quite as well as when it is connected. (oh, and it is quite noisy when it is disconnected).
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twobirds wrote:

omg your kidding!? exploded? maybe it was split already and thats why it wouldn't stay on?. does it go to the exhaust or egr...refresh my mem plz. does it make load noises at idle too? or just going down the road?
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ShoeSaleman wrote:

There is a metal pipe (maybe three quarter inch tubing or so) leading from the fuel injection to the exhaust manifold (or maybe it is from the exhaust to the fuel injection?) In that pipe is a smaller pipe with a bulged nipple. On that is a rubber vacuum line that leads to the DPFE EGR Sensor (this is not to the EGR Valve but two feet away on the pulleys side of the motor) That wont stay connected to the smaller pipe with the bulged nipple... and that is the rubber vacuum hose that burst when clamped.

It's only noisy when accelorating. In fact, it is almost impossible to make it noisy when revving it in park. It has to be under load (transmission engaged and accelerorating) to make it noisy.
The hose was in good shape before it exploded. I had it off the car and looked it over thoroughly.
Finally, I happen to own two 94 Taurus's. One is the wagon that is having the problem and the other is a sedan with the same 3.0 motor. I inspected the rubber vacuum hose on both vehicles and both are equally "loose" on the nippled pipe. Neither had any sort of a clamp holding the vacuum tube to the nippled pipe but both have a clamp holding it to the DPFE EGR Sensor.
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twobirds wrote:

That sure sounds like high backpressure in the exhaust. I would think you would also have other drivability concerns though. ??? I was thinking plugged EGR port, but even then.....naah. Let us know what you find out.
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Tom Adkins wrote:

It was the catalytic converters. I guesse enough exhaust was blowing through that little pipe that the motor could still breath enough to run well.
The rear converter was severely restricted, but the front one wasn't all that bad. - Anyway, problem solved. Thanks for the replies.
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twobirds wrote:

cool, does the car seam to run any different? just curious.
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ShoeSaleman wrote:

Not really. The car ran great even with a plugged catalytic converter due to the leak allowing the exhaust a place to go. I thought it would perhaps be a little more powerful now that it is unrestricted, but I can't notice a difference.
Keep in mind that this is a wagon with a 3 litre V6, so it wasn't the most powerful feeling of vehicles to begin with. It has never been what I would call "snappy".
Before driving the tauruses I have now, I owned a 1972 Olds Delta with a 455 and a 1972 Mercury Comet with a 302. Going from big old V-8 motors to six cyllinders was sort of a shock I've never quite recovered from. - That comet was indeed "snappy" and though the Olds wasn't "snappy", it was incredibly powerful in comparison to these Tauruses.
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Spend $17.00, then you have a way to test. http://www.sjdiscounttools.com/kdt2521.html
Connect the hose from the tool to the tube that goes to the exhaust manifold, read the back pressure.
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