98 mustang wheel hot

Girlfriend has a '98 mustang and one of the front wheels is running a good bit hotter than the others.
I don't seem to hear any unusual noises.
I have (post wheel getting hot) replaced the front pads which were low.
What should I look at? My inclination is a sticking caliper but I thought since the new pads are operating the caliper at a different place I thought this might weigh against that.
Something with the ABS,perhaps needs bleeding or is it most likely in need of a new caliper?
Jeff
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On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 10:55:09 -0400, jeff

If you are sure the calipres are not sticking when hot, you should next make sure the brake pedal is returning fully. There are occasions where the booster has not completely failed but, has a damaged control valce. This may cause it to partially release keeping the brakes partially applied. You can test this by lifting the pedal with your toe.
Make sure the calipres are properly lubricated and free to move back and forth by hand in the holders. This is best done before removing them with the old pads still in place with the pistons retracted. You can always remove the pads, push the pistons back and replace them in the holder to check this. Do one at a time.
Another problem not necessarily always associated with age is a defective brake hose. Sometimes the inner liner separates and partially blocks the fluid path. If you have any bulging of the outer surface, the hose is definitely bad although this may or may not be an indicator of an internally collapsed hose. The hoses are not terribly expensive and are easy to change. Correct size line or flare nut wrenches are highly recommended for brake line work.
Lugnut
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lugnut wrote:

Not at all! you

OK, will test.

I don't know how to do that. I usually use a C clamp to compress. I suppose I should open the bleeder to make it easier?
Should I loosen up the caliper dust seal and give it a shot with PB Blaster, or something else like white lithium, or...

Ahh, didn't know it had a liner.
If you have

Got the line wrenches. Are collapsed lines common, or as common as a bad caliper?
On another topic, my '88 New Yorker has a blown CV boot and I've repacked it with medium to light (red) viscosity bearing grease (it was making some noise). Should that be something heavier? The boots are $20 and the whole axel is only $60, even though this quieted it down I can't help but feel that the CV axle is a better deal, not like I want to throw money into a car I'd rather replace!
Thanks, Jeff

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On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 14:28:03 -0400, jeff

That will make it easier.

Do not screw around with the boot. It is sevured in it's groove by the piston. Once you get it out, you have to pull the piston and start over with a new seal and boot. Generally speaking, petroleum products or distillates like penetrants should not be used on or around brake parts. Brake fluid is the best lube for that. The lube for the calipers is also specific to that task.

Not a liner in the sense it is replaceable independantly of the hose. If there is a problem with any component of the hose, the hose must be replaced as a unit. Some parts diagrams and marketing materials show the various layers of a hose.

I have no idea which is more common. Neither is uncommon.

The grease in CV joints is usually more like peanut butter - a fairly heavy grease. The problem with an open boot is the rapid collection of particulate contamination from dirt. The grease will very quickly turn into a very abrasive mix. Unless you know a boot has just opened and the joint is in good condition, the best course ir a rebuilt axle. There are boots which can be installed in place but, my experience is they are a short term bandaid on the problem. Axle replacement is not a bad job if you have the tools.

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did you file the notches in the pads when you installed them to get free play? Does the moveable caliper slide freely?
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You should also verify that the wheel bearings are turning freely. They could be worn out and/or overtightened.
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