A radio

Would it be possible to take a Ford radio (one of those 18C868 contraptions) and somehow wire it so you could use it outside of the car with either the speakers from the car or speakers of your own?
I've seen pictures on stereo repair sites or radios working outside of a car. Do I have to specially wire it, or is there something I can buy?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It all depends on what you want to do. I've found that auto radios often outperform home systems, especially for reception. Some years ago I modded a mid-late 80s Delco ETR radio (Those could be easily upgraded by plugging in various boards, etc)with better tuner section and high output amps, etc. Due to my choices there was no room for a tape player in the radio.(yea, it's been a while). I then built it into an enclosure with 4 premium speakers, a power supply and a telescoping antenna. The cabinet was covered with black fake leather. It was the radio in my bay at the dealership and soon became the "shop" sound system. It would fill the entire service department with sound. When I left, everybody took up a collection and offered me $300 for it. I took the money with the intention of building another one, but I never got a "round tuit". It may have cost me $75 total to build it, likely less. It was great for parties and other get togethers because it was portable, about 30 lbs. Being an automotive radio, it was pretty durable too. Fabricating the cabinet was the hardest part.
This sounds similar to what you have in mind, so yes it can be done. Newer Ford premium systems have a head unit, remote radio, external amps, etc. in many applications. If you have all of the parts and cabling, it should be very doable if you have basic electrical knowledge.
If you're not able to modify the cabling for those systems, I would suggest a stand alone OEM radio(Think 94 Taurus w/o Premium sound) or aftermarket unit. OEM Ford stand alone units (no external amps, modules, etc.) with CD are quite rare or non existent AFAIK. I don't recall ever seeing one. A CD player would be a must if I were to build one today.
On a side note, Philco did this very thing during WW-II. They weren't allowed to produce radios, but were allowed to adapt existing car radios for home use in left over cabinets. One sold on Ebay a few days ago: http://tinyurl.com/3ddd6q Fugly radio, but the idea was pretty cool.
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How about a 12 volt battery?

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Not very practical. A 12V DC power supply will be much more useful. The usual 'bricks' are too small -- need something capable of delivering around 5A. Easy to find and inexpensive.
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Happy Traveler wrote:

I think Radio Shack still carries a 12V, 5A power supply. Last of a dying breed, it seems.
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A much better way to buy such things is from real electronic part suppliers, like Digikey, Mouser, Newark, Allied, etc. It can be a challenging experience for those not versed in electronic terminology, because the catalogs are likely to have many thousands of items under the 'DC power supply' category. But if he is serious about that project, he will enlist someone like that anyway.
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"Happy Traveler" wrote

You'll find a bunch of them in the dumpster behind the computer store, usually inside old 486 and early Pentium cases. FREE!!! (Use the AT, not the ATX style)
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MasterBlaster wrote:

that's a switching power supply you know. And its the 5 volt rail that has the high current output.
Bob
-
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Bob Urz wrote:

In my old CB radio days some of the less well to do that couldn't afford a decent PS would use old computer PS's with success.

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Jeff Mayner wrote:

supplies. These supplies need a load on the outputs to function properly. Not loading the high current 5 volt supply can cause problems. Not to mention if its a ATX supply, you would have to hot wire it to even start up.
Bob
-
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Happy Traveler wrote:

I used to go to Zuma Beach on the weekends, it think it was back in the pleistocine era, and there was a guy that would bring a good car radio, 4 speakers, and a car battery out and set it up right on the beach. He'd play the thing all day long. The battery was a marine, deep-cycle. The set-up blasted.
That thing was a chick-magnet. Some of us should have paid him. :-)
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Happy Traveler wrote:

I meant to include:
Does the op want to use the radio away from any easily attained power source? If so, a battery set-up would do just fine. If he just takes it out of the car, and stays by the car, he can use an inverter, say at a picnic or someplace like that.
If he has access to a power source, then yes, a ps makes the most sense. If he's running an amp then he'd have to use a much more powerful PS, much like the 75 amper I have in my garage. ;-)
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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 11:31:38 -0700, "Jeff Mayner" wrote:

You don't want to run a radio for long periods from a battery through a 12VDC to 120VAC inverter, then convert back down to run the radio - the conversion losses in the inverter and the radio's internal power supply section combined will chew up the batteries way too fast. You want to go straight from the Battery DC to the radio circuits (usually also DC) with as few power conversions as possible.

If you try to run a high-powered stereo amp on a power supply, even a 75 Amp rated supply may not be enough - I've seen Competition sound systems that draw over 1000A on the peaks, with a separate battery and multi-Farad stiffening capacitor system for each amplifier. And a stereo that has power supply issues sounds really sick when the sound starts clipping and dying on the peaks...
If you were going to make a Boom Box out of a car radio, I would go for the simple and effective with an Optima Spiracell AGM Deep Cycle battery (yellow top) and a small battery float-charger rated for a modest output of 3 to 5 amps or so.
When plugged into an external power outlet the float charger will supply the average modest radio power needs - when the bass starts really kicking there will be peak loads on the battery into the power amp that can exceed 25 or 50 amps for a few milliseconds at a time, depending on the size of the amp.
But as long as the /average/ power draw is not too much over the capacity of the battery float charger you can go all day. Let the battery fully charge overnight.
--<< Bruce >>--
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