About how much are batteries for a 79 ford t-bird?

Does anyone know?

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stephgenoway wrote:

Uhhhm?
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What does the store that sells batteries for a 79 TBird say they cost?
Many schools offer courses in dealing with everyday life... One or more of these may be beneficial....

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stephgenoway wrote:

$47.99. $5.00 core.
Rob
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trainfan1 wrote:

The poster stated batteries... these cars didn't have dual batteries did they?
Theres a 78 up the street from me... mint condition.. and i live in a climate with snow, and use salt on the roads in the winter... this car sits outside all year... not sure how its survived so well! Little old lady drives it.
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Picasso wrote:

Not that I know of, but Ford did offer a dual battery option in some cars for cold climates at one time. I have no idea of when or models covered, I just remember seeing it in some old literature from the 60s or early 70s. I doubt it was an option in '79.

That fine Ford quality maybe? ;) There's no telling why some cars survive almost eternally and most don't. I recently looked at a 62 Galaxie XL that had been here in Northern Ohio all of it's life. They were notorious rust buckets from what I've heard. It had been through many (25?) Ohio winters as a daily driver, though not recently. The car was rock solid, never repainted (it showed), 90+K miles, worn upholstery, rather sloppy front end and all. There were grainy rust areas on many pinch welds and seams along with brown grainy rust around the welded areas of the frame. No actual "rot" though, except the driver and passenger floor wells. They were like swiss cheese toward the front, but 3" from the rot on all sides was solid painted metal. The rear floor was nearly like new. It was a fantastic car for a resto. I passed because it just wasn't appealing to me at his ($6000) price. It was a real anomaly for this particular car in this area.
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So we don't have to offer a retraction for lack of information (as Jim did), is this a full size automobile or a radio controlled model ?
Bill
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On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 20:47:14 -0500, "stephgenoway"
Depends on what you want or need... For a new, plain standard 'Maintenance Free' Group 24 with a 4 or 5 year warranty, anywhere between $50 - $75. I'd be suspicious if the price is too low, unless you're sure the seller will stand behind the warranty...
There are construction differences between the 3 - 4 - 5 year batteries, you are literally buying time. Batteries are perishable - use them or not, they die partly from elapsed time in service.
You want an absorbed-glass-mat "Sealed" battery, or an ultra high output, or deep-cycle - that's when they start getting expensive.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Just a brief comment here. 'Deep cycle' batteries are what the name says -- meant to deliver juice slowly, for a long time, until completely discharged. Great for applications like camping or uninterruptible power supplies (UPS). They are not designed to deliver the short burst of heavy current that a starter needs. Probably will work in that role, but starting in cold weather may be a challenge. Expensive is not always the best...

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On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 14:41:07 -0800, "Happy Traveler"

Right - but sometimes the expensive route is best for the long term. Some people buy cheap batteries to "save money", and have to replace them every year because they were trying to deep-cycle them.
When you get kids with the 2 KW Car Stereo, and they want to sit there parked and listen to said stereo, that's when you install a deep-cycle battery in the car as a second battery - with either a relay or diode charging isolator. And you suggest a higher output alternator, so it gets recharged enough while driving.
If the second battery has to go inside the car passenger compartment because there is nowhere else to put it, that's when you go for a Wound Cell AGM battery like the Optima. Expensive, but they don't outgas Hydrogen during charging, won't leak in a wreck, and they put out amazingly large amounts of current. Don't even think of shorting the terminals, they melt wrenches.
They make hybrid "Marine Starting/Deep Cycle" batteries that will handle the long discharges and still put out a decent amount of cranking current - and if you oversize it and use a BIG Group 27 in a midsize or small car that calls for a little Group 51 as stock, that's plenty to spin it over.
Now carving out enough space under the hood for a big battery tray to mount it to, that's another problem... ;-)
--<< Bruce >>--
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stephgenoway wrote:

Man, that was my first car...
Heritage edition, with a 351.
Awesome ride...
Sometimes I miss my '79 Bird, even if my '99 Grand Marquis LS has more *features*. It just doesn't seem to ride as smooth, doesn't have the same acceleration, etc... Man I do miss that ocean liner :)
Batteries are pretty standard, it should cost you about the same price as a newer car.
--
Don't drink water, fish have sex in it!

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I hope *any* battery is cheaper than a newer car ;-)
Mike (the wise guy)
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Michael Pardee wrote:

10 minutes in the corner for you, smart a**. :)
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Michael Pardee wrote:

That's what I kinda figured out :)
--
Don't drink water, fish have sex in it!

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