Amsoil

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Ok, you asked for it.
http://www.amsoil.com/performancetests/g1971/index.html
http://www.amsoil.com/articlespr/article_2003_hd_syn.htm
http://www.amsoil.com/performancetests/gearlubetest.htm
http://www.amsoil.com/performancetests/amsoil_vs_mobil1.htm
And so on.
-GV
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Hey folks, I started this whole thread and did not mean to cause flames. I got pretty much what I wanted from it. The tests referenced here are not necessarily independent. I was trying to find a source of independent testing not reported on a vendor web site to compare the products, namely Mobile1 and Amsoil for both oil and filter products. I have not seen this yet.
I did learn the following: 1. Amsoil is sold through a pyrmid structure. This is a negative to me. 2. There are very satisfied Amsoil and Mobile1 users. 3. There is no clear concensus that synthetic is better in real world benefits than non-synthetic, however lab tests and logic tend to support this.
I have used Castrol GTX for decades with no problems, and I kept nearly every car well over 100K miles, and some to 200K. I recently switched to Mobile1 in one car, and I am planning a switch for 2 new cars to something synthetic. Whether there is a real world benefit for me or not is to be determined.
Thanks again for your comments and insights.
Larry
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Flames? Where? If there are any I'm certainly not offended by them. Believe me I'd love to see some sort of "oil shootout" test, but I guess the best you can do is get the info that's out there and make your own decisions.

Yeah I'm not a fan of MLM's myself. This is why I buy my Amsoil direct, there's no middle-man to directly support the pyramid.

And I'm a satisfied Amsoil user, and there's lots of others. Ask around in the Taurus Car Club, there were (at least at one point) several satisified Amsoil users who actually did their own oil analyses, with no problems.

Yep. Just ask people who've had their engines not get ruined after their oil pump blew during a race (thanks to using synthetics) :-D
-GV
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Well then you must be a dealer
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How many times do I have to tell you I'm not a dealer??
You can order Amsoil directly online through the website!
-GV
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I guess you don't have a clue what an independent test is. Hint..... you won't find it at amsoil's website. Bob

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Some of those linked are independent, not all. Posted for reference only, anyway.
-GV
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I see all those links are at the Spamsoil web site.

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Look, my Father-in-law sells this stuff and uses it too. However, I use Mobil 1. It's a whole lot cheaper and is readily available in a wide variety of SAE designations. I would strongly advise not using Amsoil. Not that it's a bad product. It's not. It's just that there are equal products at a better price. As to their filters? If they were so great the manufacturers would use them too. Use the part recommended by the automaker and change them often.
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R. J. Talley
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We love Amsoil customers that push there oil changes to 12,000 miles. I have already done a few motors because of this. Just because there is limioted viscosity breakdown in a synthetic after 10-12000 miles does not mean the oil is still clean and free of contaminates. Mostly what we see is people don't even check the level for 6-7000-8000 and by then its done the damage. :) Brad
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Oh so by that logic, Goodyear tires are better than who-flung-dung tires, but auto mfr's ALWAYS put goodyear tires on their cars right?? :-D
Oh and to clarify, I've been using (not selling, I'm not a dealer, or a shill, just my own personal experiences) Amsoil filters and Series 2000 0W-30 oil for years in my car with no problems. Oil filter change every 6 mo, oil+filter change every 12 mo. And let me tell you, if nothing else, my winter starts are 100x better than with old dino oil (as in, the car usually won't start in the winter with dino oil, get it?) And I was using valvoline (dino) before the change as well.
-GV
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Man, the tone of your response is really snotty. I'm sorry if I touched a nerve..that wasn't my point. Look folks, for the record. I lived in Montana for eight years. During that time I used Amsoil most of the time. My cold starts were great, even at -50; which happened several times. I ran the oil in my crankcase, the gear lube in the tranny and rear end and I used the grease in my bearings. MY gas mileage was about 1-2 mpg better and on those really cold mornings, moving the shift lever was way easier. All of that being said, I'm now twenty years older and the world has changed. There are other synthetics on the market that are cheaper. So, I recommend using them instead. As far as those extended change intervals, they're not for me. I change between 4,000 and 5,000, more frequently if I am in the desert a lot. Oil get dirty. Filters don't get all of it. Changing oil is cheap insurance...unless you use very expensive oil. Then it's more expensive insurance but it's still cheaper than a breakdown. Use good oil, syn or dino. Change it often. Buy what's on sale as long as it's SAE rated. That's my $.02
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starting is 100 times better, any data that says it is 100 times, not 99 times or 101 times. As in other posts you are stating opinion and conjecture as fact. Fact is, any lube oil with a synthetic base oil, or dino oil with the correct amount of pour point depressant will start better in cold weather.

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Nope, I'm stating facts from personal experience. Fact: *my* car starts better in the winter with Amsoil vs. regular oil.
-GV
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wrote:

I would definitely agree with not using Amsoil. Apparently most of their oils haven't been approved by the API. Look for the little circular symbol on the bottles saying "API Service ..." and showing the SAE viscosity. It ain't there.
Run away! Run away!
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Larry, My mech. installed the 50 weight oil in my 5.0 crown vic. motor saying it had very large oil ports and could handle the higher viscosity oil. I'm hearing the Castrol Syntec is newest and more advanced tech. on the synthetics and will be changing over next oil change. Best part is supposed "cleaning out" of engine if you do initial change 3-4x miles after changeover from conv. oil. My car now runs 190 or lower (also flushed cooling system) and oil is already very black after 3x miles so it must work! Watch for multiple drain plugs on some of the larger Ford motors. Failure to open both can leave a quart of the old stuff in there! Bob/Orlando Lovin my '89 "Blue Kangaroo"!

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High Temperature/High Shear (ASTM D-4683)
The High Temperature/High Shear Test measures a lubricant's viscosity under severe high temperature and shear conditions that resemble highly-loaded journal bearings in fired internal combustion engines. In order to prevent bearing wear, it is important for a lubricant to maintain its protective viscosity under severe operating conditions. The minimum High Temperature/High Shear viscosity for a 30 weight oil is 2.9 cP. As shown in the graph, AMSOIL Synthetic 10W-30 Motor Oil surpasses this minimum standard and displayed the highest High Temperature/High Shear viscosity in the group. The superior viscosity retention of AMSOIL Synthetic 10W-30 Motor Oil in the face of severe temperature and shear conditions allows it to provide continuous, unsurpassed protection for engine bearings, extending equipment life and preventing wear.
10W-30 Viscosity
AMSOIL----------------------------------------------------------3.51 cP Quaker State PeakPerformance----------------------3.37 Castrol GTX Drive Hard --------------------------------3.35 Valvoline Syn Power ---------------------------------3.30 Mobil 1 Super Syn Power -------------------------3.30 Valvoline ----------------------------------------------3.28 Mobil Drive Clean -----------------------------3.20 Pennzoil with Purebase ----------------3.16 Quaker State Synthetic --------------3.15 Pennzoil Synthetic -------------------3.14 Castrol Syntec ----------------------3.13
March 2003 test results
To respond via e-mail, simply take the, "REMOVEXX" out of my return e-mail address.
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This is meaningless. A fluid film bearing needs a film of fluid. Period. Since we don't know the starting viscosity of the oils tested the end results are meaningless again. the 10W-30 is just the promised viscosity not the actual product viscosity. You many well want a thin but stable fluid film to obtain max power and fuel economy. Higher viscosity alone is not the solution.
Richard.
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You will never convince the Amsoil crowd with facts. They consist of two groups - the first are the distributors who are in the business to make money from an over-priced product by making exaggerated claims (note the misleading scale of the graph above), the second group consists of those who have been taken in by the first group and will never admit that they have overpaid for an average product. Regards
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Exactly right. Then there are their cousins who pay $ 20.00 a quart for the Slick50 type oil additive products. At least in the "old days" the STP oil additive advertised by Richard Petty was only a coule of bucks. (Maybe thats $ 20 in "todays" money..HAHAHA) R
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