Anyone know the transmission type/name for this car?

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Said:


As far as I know it's the same one the Windstar used. just look it up on the web. Some last a long time, many don't. AX4N was a bit better than the earlier AX4S,AXOD etc were not very good in the Windstar.
Steve R.
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Some may have that opinion but it always has to do with proper maintenance. If there were actually a design defect in any product, as the phrase "prone to fail" indicates then they would all be failing and that was never the case.
We had the same situation with failing gaskets in the 3.8 engine. Because some fleet vehicles accumulate mileage more quickly than private vehicles, and we did the proper maintenance, we discovered failing gasket long before the engine was damaged by diluted oil, and changed the gasket. Fleets were also the first to realize that the replacement gasket was not correcting the problem.
It was a result of what fleets first discovered that led Ford to begin litigation with the gasket manufacturers, who were blaming owner negligence as the cause. Similar to Toyotas contention that owner negligence was the cause their "oil sludge" problem, when in fact both the gasket problem and the sludge problem we manufacturing problems by the gasket manufacturers and with Toyota new head design that led to oil "coking" around the valves. I was deposed by Ford legal council as a witness for Ford in the pending litigation.
The result of Fords ligation was an out of court settlement that helped all manufacturers, using gaskets with asbestos replacement materials that were not up to the job, to agree to pay 80% of the cost of fixing engines. However by then reputations were damaged
In Toyotas case the result was an extend warranty on those engines that were effected by their sludge problem, after we produced records that verified that sludge was occurring in engines that fleets serviced, at the propter times, using the proper filter and oil. Toyota dealers, using the proper filter and oil at the propter times, were starting to see the sludge in engines, as well.

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The AX4N in my 2001 Sable was given "proper maintenance" at the L-M dealership, at earlier service intervals than specified by Ford. This was done specifically because I knew of the problems with the AX4N and its predecessors. It failed anyway at around 97,000 miles - failing with practically no warning. We had just enough time to get the vehicle off the interstate before it would no longer move the vehicle.
I agree with Steve R's comment - some do, some don't. My '96 Sable did not have a total failure up to the 127,000 miles I owned it. My 2005 Sable has had no failures as of 58,000 miles.
Derek
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Certainly some can still fail, I never said none will failed. What I said was that tranny was not prone to fail, as was suggested, big difference Even properly maintained vehicles can still have a failure. If anything is prone to fail they all will fail and that was never the case.
As I said previously the fleet service company, I formerly owned, serviced most brands of vehicles domestic and foreign for nearly 100 different government and corporate fleets in six eastern states.
Over the years many thousands of them were Taurus', with that tranny and the failure rate was no greater then the average number of failure rates for transmissions, in general.

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you were going to keep and drive the car as is a salvage title would make sense. However, a 93 Taurus has very little value on the resale market - I'd take what they are offering and put that money directly towards the purchace of your "upgrade" = forget all the hassle and uncertainty around the value of the "salvage" car.
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Bottom lines of your VIN decal.... there is a listing "TR".... beneath that a single letter.... If it it a <L> then you have the AX4S trans. If the letter is a <X> then you have the AX4N trans...
Now... the S stands for synchronous and the N stands for non-synchronous... we'll leave it at that for now....
Additionally, the AX4S is the old AXOD transmission renamed... and the letters AXOD will be stamped in the main control cover. The AX4N has, at some time in the past, been re-identified as the 4F50N...

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On The Date of Fri, 09 Oct 2009 00:09:38 GMT, "Jim Warman"

Below the TR it has an X letter, so it's the "AX4N" non synchronnous Automatic Transmission..
Is there anything I can learn from that, now that I know which tranny I have?
Is the tranny known as a work horse or a lot of problems?
I appreciate your help.
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Did you try your local ford dealership? Surely someone there will know.

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