Battery Frozen

Page 2 of 2  


Actually, the liquid in a charged battery *is* a sulphuric acid solution. In a fully charged battery, it's a strong solution. As the battery discharges, the acid solution becomes weaker and weaker, approaching that of water. This is how a hygrometer is able to measure the condition of a battery. Sulphuric acid is denser than plain water, so the float level changes according to the battery charge.
The chemical reaction in a battery converts lead + sulphuric acid into lead sulphate + water. Charging a battery reverses this process, just as long as the process hasn't progressed too far and you have an unchargeable 'sulphated' battery.

There's "dead" (battery below 10 volts and unable to crank the starter) and then there's "really dead" (sulphated). A dead, partially discharged battery still has a strong enough acid solution to prevent freezing.

Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 09 Dec 2005 16:17:52 GMT, "Bob Bailin"

Thanks Bob
I learned something new from your reply, and also know how a hygrometer works too.
THANK YOU !
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.