Break problem...

I have a 1991 Ford Explorer and when I took it in for the safety inspection, it failed due to the vehicle not being able to stop soon enough in 20'...
and I was thinking that the soft peddle might have been due to air in the lines which I have found in other vehicles, but the Chilton's Manual says that if you have a vehicle that has a light on the dash that displays ABS, that you can not bleed the breaks by hand like most other vehicles, is there some simple way of bleeding the breaks and allow the breaks to grab with the pedal mid way down instead of all the way?
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Everything depends on whether your sysem is RABS (rear antiskid) or 4WABS (4 wheel antiskid) and whether air has been introduced into the pump/accumulator... I can only suggest that you bleed the brakes normally at this time and, if you have the 4WABS system, have the brakes service bled by a competent shop a your first opportunity....
Why, in Gods name, are you driving a car with less than ideal brakes???

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He probably just has moisture in the the fluid. It is normal for moisture to be absorbed into the fluid over time. The cap on the reservoir isn't exactly air tight, it has a vent to allow in air as the level drops. Manufacturers do recommend replacing the break fluid at specific intervals. Bleed the breaks until you see clear fluid coming out of the bleeder valve. You will end up changing over most of the fluid in the system so buy one of the big bottles of fluid.
Scott
Jim Warman wrote:

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