Can I change the freeze plugs on a 4.9L without removing the engine?

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Not really. People call them "freeze plugs" but they are are in the block becasue they are needed to provide a means of locating the interior portions of the sand casting molds (i.e., the core) and to allow the sand to be cleaned out of the interior passages after the casting cools and the core has been reduced to sand by vibrationg the casting. I suppose at some point in history in some engine the plugs used to seal these opening must have been pushed out when water in the block froze, but for modern engines they are not designed-in to prevent the block from being damaged by frozen coolant. I think you'd have to be very lucky to have an engine "saved" from freeze damage by the core plugs. I think in most cases, if forzen coolant pushed out the core plugs, you'd likely have more significant damage. I've only ever seen one block damaged by frozen water and the core plugs weren't pushed out at all - the whole side of the block had been pushed out and cracked.
Ed
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On Thu, 16 Sep 2010 09:07:52 -0700, "Jeff Strickland"

a freeze-up the head and/or block is often done. They are there to facilitate removal of the sand casting cores. There location is optimized for core removal, not for freeze damage protection.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

yep, no such thing as a freeze plug. that is a slang used by those that don`t know any better. they are simply core plugs, nothing more. KB
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Exactly they dont stop blocks from cracking if froze. Its too remove the sand .
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... and as problemg go, this one isn't really very serious. Freeze plugs fail for two reasons, they are pushed out because the block froze, or they rotted. If they are pushed out because the block froze, they are doing their job, and by definition this isn't a "problem." It's more of a pain in the ass than a serious problem.
Frankly, fixing the freeze plugs from the bottom of the motor is the easiest way. Put the truck on a lift and work on it from underneath. There should be no need to remove the exhaust manifold from the head, but it might be necessary to take the exhaust pipe off of the manifold -- remove the muffler bearing -- and move it out of the way.
I don't think that there is enough JB Weld in the universe to fix a freeze plug leak.
Cooper is on the right track here, Beam has jumped the rails.
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I don't know where you live but imagine your idea of cold and my idea of cold differ.
I have never seen a "freeze" plug push out to save the block... This isn't the "job" of the plug anyway... see the post about "core plugs".
Put the truck on a lift... of course everyone has at least one of these available... What part of the original post did we forget? This poor shmuck is working in the dirt like an Arab...

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I have seen exactly 3 freeze pugs fail in my 40+ years of automobile ownership. None of the due to freezing, all of them from rotting from the inside out.
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On 9/19/10 4:12 AM, Jim Warman wrote:

This is an inappropriate ethnic slur.
If the OP doesn't have access to a safe lift, I hope the OP uses ramps and is very careful to make sure that the vehicle can't come crashing down on top of him. I knew of one mechanic where this happened. The costumer came back to find the mechanic under the collapsed car. Instead of calling for help (the nearest fire station is only blocks away), the mechanic told the lady who owned the car how to lift the car back up with the equipment. It worked - sort of - the car slipped off the jack and killed him dead.
The morals of the story:
1) Always use proper equipment to lift a car.
2) Always make sure that the car is extremely stable before you get under it. Always make sure that you're getting under the car unless there are backup devices (I always made sure that there jackstands in place in case the jack itself failed).
3) If there is an accident, always call in the professionals who know how to remove people from accidents safely, especially when they are just a few minutes away. Better have the professionals do it than have someone die.
Jeff

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Seems to me the real moral is, never take you vehicle to a "mechanic" who does not even have enough sense to stay out from under a vehicle that has not been properly lifted off the surface. ;)

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wrote:

Never work on a mechanical hoist where the lift stops are disabled or damaged. Never work under a car on a jack without proper jackstands. Never work under a car supported on cinder blocks. A chunk of firewood, grain end up, is not a safe support unless you put a board on top, grain across the frane do deither the board or block can split.
If a hydraulic hoist lets go, you have a bit of time to get out from under as they come down slowly.
Never work under a hoist in questionable condition - I've seen hoist arms come off/break, dropping the car off the hoist.
This is all common sense. Working under a car supported only by a jack is a pretty good way of thinning the gene pool.

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It isnt an ethnic slur at all. What would you prefer he say? Working on the ground like a sand flea?
Maybe you need to stay in an academic environment.. I am not sure that you could change a Welch plug in the real world. :>)
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On 9/19/10 9:09 PM, hls wrote:

That would be better. Or how about lay on the ground?
If you don't think that's an ethnic slur, you're wrong.

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Youre wrong. Division of classes is Sociology 101. And division of race race is right. Evidenced by the fact that only 2% of people marry outside their race. In spite of the racist attempts of the US gubment and affirmative action to hold the black man down.

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And I guess if you had to LIE on the ground (not "lay") in the snow, and someone said you were working like an Eskimo mechanic, you would think that is an ethnic slur???
We wont even get into the term "shade tree mechanic".
You take yourself all too seriously.
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I'm glad there's such an expert here!
Yeah, it may be the 'expert' is right.
But I've had motors over the years that the freeze plugs went with time, with nothing else wrong. I've had two vehicles with 200CID 6's that in both cases the read freeze plug went. In both cases a big screwdriver got the plug out easily, and in went an 'expandable' plug. Problem solved.

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I replaced a leaking plug in the side of a 1967 Mustang 300 CID. I don't remember how I got the old one out, but I was going to try prying the new one into place with a "blue bar" without taking off the exhaust manifold. That didn't work. After taking the manifold off, it was pretty easy to put the new plug in. I would think an F150 would have more side room than the Mustang, and wither one of them... you are working with a straight six in an engine bay where a V8 fits, so I wouldn't expect any maneuvering room problems.
There were another three or four years and quite a few miles put on that car before it was sold. No hidden problems partially exposed by a leaking piece of tin in a 30 year old car.
--
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley Lake, CA, USA GPS: 38.8,-122.5

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On Thu, 16 Sep 2010 22:41:57 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@36.usenet.us.com wrote:

Mustang, or any other Ford passenger car in North America. The 'Stang would have been either a 200 or a 240.
The installation problem remains - without removong the manifold getting the new plug in is virtually impossible - and replace ALL FIVE when you are at it.
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On 9/16/10 7:16 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

From Mustangspecs.com for the '67 Mustang:
Available Engines: 200cid 6cyl 1V 120hp 289cid 2V V-8 200hp 289cid 4V V-8 225hp 289cid 4V V-8 271hp 390cid 4V V-8 320hp

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I dont believe the 240 I6 was offered.
The 200 straight six was available, the 289, the 289 HP, and the 390 v8, I believe.
But the point is to strip the engine down to the point you can get at the welch plugs, and twist them out of there. I usually do it with a beat up screwdriver or long punch.
Then use a suitable driver (or socket that you dont give a damn about) and carefully tap the new ones in.
As others have mentioned these are NOT freeze plugs. They are there to wash out the foundry sand after the block is cast, and for nothing else.
I dont really know when the 427 crossbolt was offered, if indeed it ever was. I have heard it was, but have never seen one. In 1968 I got one of the Hubert Platt 428 Cobrajets. At the time, they said I could order a 427 but ONLY with 4 speed tranny, and no warranty worth discussing. Dealers here lie a lot.
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