Cant Move Distributor 400 Engine

I got a 79 Ford 4WD pickup with a 400 engine. The timing needs to be adjusted a little, but I can not get the distributor to turn. I completely removed the bracket and bolt that holds it. I have
hammered on it to the point that I fear breaking it. That was before and after soaking the base with WD40. I tried to pry it up and out even using a 4 foot piece of 2x4. I broke the 2x4 in half, yet dist. will not turn. This is rediculous. I have always owned GM vehicles, and have never had this problem. It's always been loosen the bolt and a tap with a hammer is all that it takes. If this is one of Fords better ideas, I think I'll trade it in for another GM.
Anyone have any idea how to turn or remove it? What the heck is holding it anyhow?
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it is being held by 25 years of gunk that has froze it solid to the block. the only way I have found to release it is to 1: heat the block around the distributor with a torch, and then, 2: put a strap wrench on the dist. and turn it both ways to free it. 3: after free, remove and clean base, coat with neversieze,and reinstall and set timing.

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Have you tried turning the engine over by hand? Might help if you have another person, one of you can pull on the distributor while the other turns it.
Nic

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wrote:

Well, I removed the clamp entirely, and drove the truck around, thinking that it would turn loose. I even revved it up and down with a heavy foot. Nothing happened.
I bought this used truck 4 years ago. I was dealing with a broken leg at the time, so I had a mechanic tune it up. He checked the timing, and did turn the distributor. I was watching. That's what puzzles me. In 4 years, this thing is so darn stuck ???? Someone told me the distributor is aluminum, and it's the corrosion between aluminum and iron. But as hard as I have pounded and pryed on it, it should have come right out. If I was any tougher on it, I know it would break. I plan to put anti-sieze on it, IF I ever get it out.
PS. I have another identical engine block. That engine is blown, but I bought the truck for parts, and before I junked the body, I decided to pull the engine and transmission, rather than remove all the individual parts, such as starter, manifolds, etc. I tried to pull the distributor on that block, and it;s also siezed. Even with the engine flipped upsidedown.
Isn't there some sort of puller made for this?
What a pain !!!
Thanks to all.
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When they've been allowed to stick that long and hard, you may just end up having to drop the pan and drive it out from below. Of course this involves replacing it, because it will be a piece of shrapnel when you are done. BTW, turning the engine will have no effect. A slide hammer might just bring it out if you can get a good bite and pull very squarely on it. But like you have found, it will probably break before it comes out. I've driven several out from below. Usually the engine has been out of the vehicle, but I've done a few in the car.
--
Steve Barker

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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote in

Besides all the gunk, aluminum seized into cast iron. Someone forgot the anti-seize when they had it out.
Best way to move it is a pipe wrench. Put the wrench on the base, where the housing is thicker, and try to worry it loose. Lots of penetrating oil and time for it to soak.
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Dude, like someone said: Heat the block with a torch. How far off is the timing? Why not just let it be before you break something? GL

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I got the distributor loose finally. I local guy that is into performance cars told me to pour brake fluid around the base of the distributor and let it soak for several days, and keep adding it if I drive the truck, so it is always submerged. I did what he said for 5 days. I tapped the dist. with a hammer, put a bar under it, and it popped right out of the block. I surely was impressed... Before that, I had a 10 foot 2x4 under the dist. I hung on the 2x4 and it broke. That brake fluid did wonders !!!!!
But then came the bad news. The timing chain had jumped a tooth, and the fiber gear was missing 3 teeth. New chain and gears, and it runs well again, except I still think my carburetor needs some help.
Those fiber gears are crap. Why did they ever use that junk???

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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

hope you got the brake fluid out of the crankcase before using the engine or you gonna have alot more troubles......
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wrote:

Yep
It was nearly dry before the dist. came loose. If any got in, it was less than a teaspoon full. I changed the oil right after too, because I had to change the timing chain that same day and a litttle bit of antifreeze got in the pan.
Just curious, what kind of troubles would brake fluid in the oil cause?
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