Consultants say interference in vehicle electronics is possible

Page 4 of 4  


Ergh, you're right! Voltage vs. power... --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not necessarily - you don't know what the amplitude of the transmission is. It might not be 12 volts..Also the efficiency of the transmitter. The output of an Icom 2200 is 65 watts. It runs on 13.8 volts and draws 15 amps during transmit and .8 on standby - so 14.2 amps at 13.8 volts - or 196 watts for about 30% efficiency......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup. And because it's a serious and well-known issue, just about all cars sold in the US go through aggressive EMI testing. If only they would test other consumer products as well.
Toyota is actually better about that than most manufacturers, although they issue a whole lot of warnings about not installing high power radio equipment in their cars and they won't provide support if you do. Contrast that with Ford, which has a whole support organization to help folks putting high power radio gear into fleet vehicles (mostly due to the police market). --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

Go here to read about the FCC rules which might apply to the situation you mentioned. I don't believe there is such a rule regarding "three orders of magnitude"
<http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_09/47cfr15_09.html
Check back when you find it and cite the paragraph so that I can learn too.
Cheers and good luck
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, that's just part 15 which really just applies to unlicensed radiators that aren't covered under any other service. The old "Class D Citizens Band" is licensed under Part 95 subpart D.
Take a look at section 95.410, and 95.411. If you need more information, take a look at Part 95 subart E regarding the power rules.
The friendly people at the FCC say four watts carrier power on AM, or 12 watts PeP on SSB. This means multi-kilowatt linears are not legal. This means using modified 10M ham radio equipment on the CB band is not legal (also due to the type acceptance requirements). Oh yes, "freebanders" transmitting on the broadcast auxiliary frequencies and in the amateur radio band with modified high power CBs are also illegal.
Now, there was a time many years ago when the FCC was actually operated by engineers, and they had people who would come to your home or your vehicle and take your radio equipment away and leave you with a very large fine for illegal operation. However, we now live in an era when the FCC is run by lawyers who are more interested in using radio services as a profit center and they don't actually have many people who have the skills required for enforcement. But this does NOT mean it is legal. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

You're wrong Scott, part fifteen covers intentional, unintentional and incidental radiators, which includes everything.
The FCC never came to your home and confiscated any equipment without due process, (court action). That includes monetary forfeiture. It still happens to this very day. More so to small companies who operate illegal transmitting equipment and those who import non certified crap from the far East. Go to the FCC web site, look up enforcement actions and read.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Part 15 is a catchall. It coveres everything that isn't already covered in some other section.
It also has some wording about how products are required to accept interference from legal sources, which is where it becomes important when talking about EMI issues.

Yup, there are a few here and there, mostly due to do with pirate broadcasters and most of the rest of them are in cases where some third party actually tracked the interfering source down.
There are actually fewer enforcement actions on the part of the radio folks than there were in 1975. Needless to say there is also a lot more illegal activity today than there was back then also.
You'll notice that if you go to the FCC web site and look up enforcement actions, you won't see a single illegal CB operator. You'll notice also that if you turn to the third harmonic of channel 19 any evening, you can hear lots of folks talking with their clip-o-matic "linyers." Welcome to the wasteland. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

To sum, p.15 deals with cable, power lines, motors, switching supplies, TV's, wireless products, computers, industrial devices and related interferences to licensed services.
I never mentioned legal or illegal CB operations of which I am not involved with.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did, as did the person whom I was replying to in the message that you flamed. That was the whole point of the message you were replying to. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 Mar 2010 21:06:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

Over 100 watts of output from the linear amps on a LOT of highway rigs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.