Coolant Level Sensor

Page 1 of 2  
My coolant level sensor in the coolant reservoir has burned out...
Anyone know the bestest, cheapest way to replace it?
Thanks!
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Without knowing what car (Make, model, year, engine), it is hard to tell.
The best, cheapest way to replace it is to replace it under warranty. Ford had a problem with coolant level sensors in Ford Contours and Mercury Mystiques. They ended up replacing the entire revervoir, because they couldn't replace the sensor without changing the whole thing.
If you have one of these cars, you might be able to get Ford to replace it free (or if your car is still under warranty).
Jeff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
U-pull-it junkyard part.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1993 Mustang 5.0
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Before I would replace the sensor, I'd try cleaning it and the electrical connection first.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Been there... Done that!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What do you need that for anyway? Just keep the resevoir topped off between the MIN and MAX lines.
Unless of course you have other problems like leaking coolant and are too lazy to fix...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The sensor is malfunctioning... even when full with 50-50 coolant/water, it still ends an "empty" signal or should I say it sends no signal to the idiot light controller.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 15:27:06 -0500, "Steve Forrester"

cannot clean them buy a new one used would be futile
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the heads up!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
See the connector on the coolant level sensor? Unplug it and the false signals will cease. If your cooling system is in proper working order and resevior level checked periodically you should be Ok.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I will certainly try that, but I would have thought a disconnected connector would give the same "no signal" as the malfunctioning electrodes causing the LOW COOLANT light to remain lit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My sensor was hosed and I could only get my low coolant light to work when I jumped the connector with a paper clip.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you mean... you could only get the light to go off when the connector was jumped with a paper clip?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, opposite. I was following the debug procedure listed for my car on alldata, to confirm the light worked. I wasn't having a problem with the light or sensor, was just a 15 year old car and I was curious if the sensor/light worked anymmore. Turned out the sensor was bad. The float contact was rusted into the sensor and I could not get a continuity reading between the two terminals.
In my case, a 1990 Escort GT, I think the circuit happened to be wired such that if it failed it would just be left open. Bad sensor, no effect on powering the light. Your sensor circuit might be wired to "fail closed". Bad sensor, light's on. Just a guess.
But if that is the case a paper clip inserted into the connector wrapped with some electrical tape should do the trick temporarily to shut off the light. Worth a try at least.
Just an FYI, at this point in the life of your car you might start running into assorted electrical problems (i.e., dirty contacts, rust, corrosion, failed components) and some wiring diagrams will prove to be extremely helpful. Suggest getting an alldatadiy account, best $25 I ever spent on my old car.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are right, again... I am having assorted random electrical problems and will most definitely be following your advice.
Thanks, again!
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 14:31:46 -0500, "Steve Forrester"

pull the bulb BEFORE you SHORT something out a sensor may have RESISTANCE
a paperclip is no SUSTITUTE for wire makes for a nice fire if it gets hot
play safe with wires only YOU can prevent a fire
hurc ast
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 23:59:16 GMT, barney snipped-for-privacy@sky.com wrote:

Paper clips not made of wire out in Alberta?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was wrong and you were right...
Now that the sensor is disconnected, is the absense of any signal to the computer going to confuse the car's "brain"?
Thanks!
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Check the wiring diagrams but I don't think this circuit would go through the car's computer. I think it's a straight ahead analog circuit to power the light on the dash.
Power -> sensor -> light -> ground
There are some really great ways to confuse the car's brain (TP sensor comes to mind) but this shouldn't be one of them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.