cracked windstar windshield info please????

i have a small crack started in the middle of the bottom of my windshield,it looks like a pebble hit it and there are 4-5 small 1 to 3 inch lines cracked
in it. i know over time the cracks could get longer, a friend of mine who works at a glass place told me that there is a way to fill them in or buff or fix them if they are not too long,just a thought but would the type of glue you buy to mount rear window mirrors on your windshield work if you tried to fill the crack with it.or is there something you can use to do it yourseelf???? any info would be great,i really don't know much about glass repair bob
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yourself. No idea what glass repair costs where you're from but here i pay around 60-65 euros wich is roughly $80 They somehow fill the crack and polish it, all that's left is a tiny spot n the center wich you probably can't see unless you look for it. Give the repair guys a call, they have fixed prices for something like that, you'll know right away.
grtz sax
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Don't mess with it yourself, have a glass shop try to fix it. Some are really good at it.
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not sure if you know this already but just incase what about your insurance? In some states Ive heard your insurance company has to fix your windshield no matter what.

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Don't use that glue. You can buy windshield repair kits which contain the right type of resin, and the applicator. It's not hard to use, but it's hard to use RIGHT :) I used this on my wife's windshield for a temporary fix while I built up the spare cash to replace the whole thing. If applied really expertly and if you're lucky, it really does make the crack less visible. More importantly, it prevents it from spreading.
However, the kits are kind of expensive, they're the best part of $20. Getting a pro glass shop to do it will be about $60 for a small crack (at least in my neck of the woods). The kits really work best on small star cracks. Also note that depending on exactly where it is, your vehicle may not pass state inspection.
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The way the pros do it is they have to apply a vacuum to it to pull the air out from between the layers of plastic (safety glass plastic), then the apply the resin/glue and polish down. Without the vacuum, you embed the air into the glass and with temperature changes, it will crack again.
Buddah
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Well, just in case you never used one: The home kit is a poor man's version of this. It has a suction cup and a syringe. You fill the syringe with a drop of resin and stick it down on the crack. You pull back on the plunger to try and evacuate as much air out of the crack as possible, and when you pull the plunger all the way out the back of the syringe, the inrushing air pushes resin into the [hopefully mostly evacuated] crack. The resin has a very low viscosity. Basically you can tell if you filled the crack properly because it mostly disappears. The kit can work really well on small stars (i.e. if you get them before they spread). It's not fantastic on long cracks like the one I was trying to patch, because you have to do it in stages and it's very hard to get it even.
In any case, the state where I live (NYS) is really anal about windshield defects, and annual inspection is $37.00 pass or fail, so really it's never worth it to use a home kit as a "permanent" fix here; if you don't get it satisfactory, you just threw away the best part of $60 ($20 kit and $37 inspection), which would have been the cost of a pro repair anyway.
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It's probably not a good idea to try to repair the windshield yourself by filling the cracks, chips and pits. Your best bet is to have a qualified technician at a glass company to repair or replace the windsheild. Your insurance company should be able to cover the repairs or replacement of your windshield. If the chips and pits in your windshield are smaller than a dime you would probably be waived from your insurance deductible. If your windshield has a crack in them, filling them would be a real pain in the ass to do. If your windsheild is cracked, it's best to have it replaced than filling them. Most qualified technicans at a glass company would probably tell you the same thing I just told you. Good luck in getting your windsheild fixed.
~CyberWolf
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